Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 88, Issue 4 (September, 1988)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (785KB)

Body Weights of Ohio Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus)
Stoll, Robert J., Jr.; McClain, Milford W. pp. 126-131
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1270KB)

Pollination Ecology of Gentiana andrewsii
Costelloe, Barbara H. pp. 132-138
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1341KB)

Annotated Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles Reported from Cedar Bog, Ohio
Lovich, Jeffrey E. pp. 139-143
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (511KB)

Caddisflies(Trichoptera) of Ohio Wetlands as Indicated by Light-Trapping
Garono, Ralph J.; Jaworski, Terrance R. pp. 143-150
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1581KB)

Use of Artificial Nest Cavities Along Ohio Interstate Highways by Bluebirds (Sialia sialis) and Mice (Peromyscus sp.)
Hsu, Minna; Humpert, Mark J. pp. 151-154
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Effects of Eroding Glacial Silt on the Benthic Insects of Silver Creek, Portage County, Ohio
DeWalt, Ralph E.; Olive, John H. pp. 154-159
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (643KB)

Preliminary Annotated Checklist of the Lepidoptera of Atwood Lake Park, Ohio
Rings, Roy W.; Metzler, Eric H. pp. 159-168
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1235KB)

Brief Note The 1987 Emergence of the Periodical Cicada (Homoptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada spp.: Brood X) in Ohio
Kritsky, Gene pp. 168-170
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (334KB)

Brief Note The Masked Shrew, Sorex cinereus, in Southwestern Ohio
Opper, Connie L.; Lorenz, Gregory C.; Barrett, Gary W. pp. 170-171
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Book Reviews
pp. 171-171
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Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (529KB)

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    Back Matter
    (1988-09)
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    Book Reviews
    (1988-09)
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    Brief Note The Masked Shrew, Sorex cinereus, in Southwestern Ohio
    (1988-09) Opper, Connie L.; Lorenz, Gregory C.; Barrett, Gary W.
    A population of masked shrews (Sorex cinereus) was found in June, 1987 at the Miami University Ecology Research Center, Butler County, Ohio. This is the first published record of the masked shrew in southwestern Ohio.
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    Brief Note The 1987 Emergence of the Periodical Cicada (Homoptera: Cicadidae: Magicicada spp.: Brood X) in Ohio
    (1988-09) Kritsky, Gene
    Brood X of the periodical cicadas emerged in parts of western Ohio during late May and June, 1987. Periodical cicadas were reported in 26 counties in western Ohio, including three new county records. The 1987 distribution was compared to the historical record of periodical cicadas in Ohio, revealing that the distribution of Brood X has been greatly reduced in the last century and that 12 counties have witnessed 4-year accelerations of the 17-year life cycle.
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    Preliminary Annotated Checklist of the Lepidoptera of Atwood Lake Park, Ohio
    (1988-09) Rings, Roy W.; Metzler, Eric H.
    A comprehensive survey of the Lepidoptera occurring at a recreational center in Carroll and Tuscarawas counties, Ohio was conducted from 1985 to 1986. Sampling was done using the following techniques: ultraviolet light traps, mercury vapor lamp plus ultraviolet light and collecting sheet, bait traps, sugaring, and netting. A total of 428 species and forms were identified and tabulated. Representative specimens were deposited in the reference collection of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio. The current status of the abundance of each species was described.
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    Effects of Eroding Glacial Silt on the Benthic Insects of Silver Creek, Portage County, Ohio
    (1988-09) DeWalt, Ralph E.; Olive, John H.
    Between March and November 1984, Silver Creek, a small tributary of the Mahoning River in northeastern Ohio, eroded into and through a small lacustrine deposit of glacial silt. During this erosional/siltation episode, the stream was very turbid and siltation was observed at least 5 km below the source of silt. Only a few individuals of the caddisfly, Neophylax, the mayflies, Isonychia and Stenonema, and the snipe fly, Atherix variegata, were collected within the silted region. Siltation abated during the winter 1984-85; by late March 1985, substantial recolonization of the previously silted area was observed. The most abundant pioneer insects were chironomids, (Larsia, Orthocladius, Microtendipes, and Stictocbironomus), black flies, (Simulidae), craneflies, (Antocha), horseflies, (Tabanidae), and caddisflies, {Hydropsyche and Neophylax). By late May 1985, recolonization of once silted areas was well advanced as indicated by a high degree of similarity in species composition and numbers of taxa between areas that were recently silted and never silted. Recolonization probably occurred mostly from downstream drift because species composition of undamaged upstream areas and of recolonized areas was very similar, and because recolonization occurred over winter when aerial/oviposition routes would have been minimal.
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    Use of Artificial Nest Cavities Along Ohio Interstate Highways by Bluebirds (Sialia sialis) and Mice (Peromyscus sp.)
    (1988-09) Hsu, Minna; Humpert, Mark J.
    Populations of eastern bluebirds in Ohio have declined. A construction project using drilled highway fence posts as nest cavities was established to increase nesting potential. These cavities were investigated to determine the degree of utilization and identify favorable habitat characteristics for nesting bluebirds. Of 296 cavities examined in 1985 on 1-71 north and 1-70 east of Columbus, six (2%) were occupied by bluebirds during June—July. Fourteen of 374 (3.7%) nest cavities were occupied by bluebirds in 1986. Most nests were found along 1-71 north. House wrens (Troglodytes aedon), house sparrows (Passer domesticus), and Carolina chickadees (Parus carolinensis) also nested in these cavities. Peromyscus sp. nests increased from 118 cavities (40%) in 1985 to 234 (62.6%) in 1986. In 1986, mice occupied 91% of the nest cavities along 1-70 west of Dayton, 88% of the cavities on 1-71 north of Columbus, and over half of the other cavities examined. Nest cavities surrounded by vegetation and cropfield were more likely to be occupied by mice. The number of empty cavities decreased from 52% in 1985 to 24.9% in 1986. Approximately 7.8% of the cavities were rotten; 16.3% were too shallow to be used by birds. Management of these nest cavities is very important. They should be maintained in good condition and mice should be excluded to improve their use by bluebirds.
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    Caddisflies(Trichoptera) of Ohio Wetlands as Indicated by Light-Trapping
    (1988-09) Garono, Ralph J.; Jaworski, Terrance R.
    The caddisfly fauna of 14 Ohio remnant bogs and fens was sampled by means of light traps operated from May to October in 1984 and 1985. A total of 37,061 adult Trichoptera representing 13 families, 43 genera, and 135 species resulted from 123 collections. New state records are reported for Glossosoma intermedium Banks, Goera calcarata Banks, Lepidostoma costale (Banks), Limnephilus hyalinus Hagen, and Oecetis ochraceae (Curtis). Detrended correspondence analysis of the 100 most abundant species revealed significant correlations between the ordination axis scores and latitude, longitude, caddisfly species richness, and diversity. Documentation of the Trichoptera of these bogs and fens may provide important baseline data for the evaluation of future environmental changes and the management of Ohio's wetlands.
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    Annotated Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles Reported from Cedar Bog, Ohio
    (1988-09) Lovich, Jeffrey E.
    Thirty-one species of amphibians and reptiles have been reliably reported from Cedar Bog, Ohio including: 5 salamanders, 11 frogs and toads, 5 turtles, 1 lizard and 9 snakes, or approximately 40% of the total number of species reported for the state. Four of these species are classified as potentially threatened, endangered or of special interest in Ohio. Environmental changes due to dredging operations, maintenance of grass fields, and artificial impoundment construction appear to have been detrimental to some species while benefiting others.
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    Pollination Ecology of Gentiana andrewsii
    (1988-09) Costelloe, Barbara H.
    The pollination syndrome of Gentiana andrewsii Griseb., a closed, blue gentian, was investigated in a disclimax community in relation to the ecological and phenological characteristics of the surrounding plant community. Gentiana andrewsii is obligately dependent upon bumblebees for pollination and seed set. The flowers are self-fertile, protandrous, and herkogamous; pollen deposition is restricted to the bumblebee's sternum. Pollen is the primary bumblebee attractant; the sugar concentration of nectar is low. The corolla reflects a purplish-blue color augmented by a dissected pattern of ultraviolet light, both well-adapted to bumblebee vision. Bumblebee species show no preference among synchronously flowering species, but caste preferences are evident, with G. andrewsii largely attracting workers. Most local bumblebees have tongues too short to retrieve nectar from the long Gentiana corolla tubes; many steal nectar from lateral perforations of the corolla tube. The blooming of G. andrewsii at the end of the bumblebee season may have resulted from selection favoring other earlier flowering competitors. Sympatric and synchronously blooming Gentiana crinita Froel. (Gentianella crinita (Froel.) G. Don, Gentianopsis crinita (Froel.) Ma) also reflects the same purplish-blue color as G. andrewsii but with different ultraviolet reflection patterns. Nectar appears to be the primary attractant in G. crinita. Queens and larger workers are the most frequent visitors, tongue length being less of a discriminating factor.
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    Body Weights of Ohio Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus)
    (1988-09) Stoll, Robert J., Jr.; McClain, Milford W.
    Average annual winter (December-February) body weights of Ohio ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) from both the glaciated northeast and the more southern unglaciated hill country ranges showed only small deviations from the 4-year (1974-1977) mean. Hill country grouse were heavier (P < 0.05) than northeastern birds in winter, but not in fall (October-November). Year-around (1969-1982) body weights were obtained only for hill country grouse. Both sexes showed rapid weight gains in the fall; juveniles (4.5-12 months of age) appeared to gain weight faster than adults. Peak weights were achieved in November and held through winter. With the onset of breeding in March, males lost weight rapidly. Lowest weights for males and probably females occurred in late spring and summer and were about 100 g (14 and 17%, respectively) below winter weights. Male grouse were consistently heavier than females; adults were usually heavier than juveniles of the same sex. Wild-trapped grouse chicks showed steady weight gains averaging about 30 g per week from hatching through 16 weeks of age. Male chicks generally averaged 6-14% heavier than female chicks after 10-17 weeks of age. Comparisons among different areas suggested that ruffed grouse from the more southerly latitudes were heavier in winter and spring, but that summer and perhaps fall weights were similar. The results suggest that body weight is not a good index of condition and reproductive success in ruffed grouse.
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    Front Matter
    (1988-09)