Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 70, Issue 3 (May, 1970)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (966KB)

Fungi Associated with the Activated-Sludge Process of Sewage Treatment at the Lebanon, Ohio, Sewage-Treatment Plant
Cooke, William Bridge pp 129-146
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1263KB)

Fresh-Water Mollusca of the Finger Lakes Region of New York
Harman, Willard N.; Berg, Clifford O. pp 146-150
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (345KB)

Eutrophication of Northeastern Ohio Lakes. I, Introduction, Morphometry, and Certain Physico-Chemical Data of Dollar Lake
Cooke, G. Dennis; Kennedy, Robert L. pp 150-161
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (785KB)

Book Review
pp 161-161
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (69KB)

A Study of Blackbird Repeats at a Decoy Trap
Burtt, Harold E.; Giltz, Maurice L. pp 162-170
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (786KB)

Seasonal Variation of the Solute Content and the Sr87/Sr86 Ratio of the Olentangy and Scioto Rivers at Columbus, Ohio
Eastin, Rene; Faure, G. pp 170-179
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (771KB)

A Geologist Looks at the Natural Vegetation Map of Ohio
Forsyth, Jane L. pp 180-191
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1274KB)

Book Reviews
pp 191-192
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (180KB)

Back Matter
pp 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1148KB)

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    Back Matter
    (1970-05)
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    Book Reviews
    (1970-05)
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    A Geologist Looks at the Natural Vegetation Map of Ohio
    (1970-05) Forsyth, Jane L.
    Boundaries on the new map of the Natural Vegetation of Ohio by Gordon (1966) neatly follow, in most places, geologic boundaries. Where this is not true, conditions controlling this distribution are either aspect, microclimate, or the result of some as-yet unrecognized variation in the geology. Vegetation-geology correlations may be generalized as follows. Beech (-maple) forests occur on better drained Wisconsin till and in outwash-free valleys in eastern Ohio. Oak-sugar maple forests occur where the geological substrate is moist enough for sugar maple, but not for beech. Mixed mesophytic forests occur on shale and on north-facing slopes in unglaciated eastern Ohio, as well as in other areas where a variety of environmental conditions results in a variety of communities, best mapped as mixed mesophytic. Mixed oak forests are composed of either dry-site ("dry") species, occurring on south-facing slopes and sandstone hills in unglaciated eastern Ohio and on well-drained gravel deposits in western Ohio, or of wet-site ("wet") species, growing on very flat plains with heavy clay soils. Swamp forest is also shown on flat, poorly drained plains, as are prairies, which are mainly "wet". What specific characteristics actually determine whether a flat, poorly drained plain will support prairie, swamp forest, or "wet" oaks are not understood. Despite these striking vegetation-geology relationships, there is much yet to be learned, particularly in the large-scale refinement of this mapping. With geologists who have learned some plants, and botanists who have learned some Ohio geology, exciting new results are possible which will help to advance both sciences.
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    Seasonal Variation of the Solute Content and the Sr87/Sr86 Ratio of the Olentangy and Scioto Rivers at Columbus, Ohio
    (1970-05) Eastin, Rene; Faure, Gunter
    The concentrations of sodium, potassium, calcium, and strontium in water samples collected from the Olentangy and Scioto Rivers at Columbus, Ohio, during 1966, have been determined. The water samples were collected at weekly intervals throughout the year and were combined into four-week composites. The average concentrations, weighted according to discharge, and the ranges of variation for each element in the Olentangy River (in units of Mg/ml) were: Na = 22.3 (16.6 to 38.5), K = 3.3 (2.2 to 4.9), Ca = 72.4 (54.4-101.5), Sr=0.923 (0.604 to 1.73). In the Scioto River the concentrations of these elements were: Na = 12.2 (5.8 to 20.3), K = 3.6 (2.2 to 5.0), Ca = 78.8 (53.2 to 96.2), Sr = 1.91 (0.954 to 2.79). In both rivers the concentrations of sodium and strontium decreased linearly with increasing discharge, whereas the concentrations of potassium and calcium did not. The concentration of potassium increased steadily during the summer and reached a peak in the fall. The Sr87/Sr86 ratio of the Olentangy River decreased with increasing discharge from 0.7116 to 0.7088 while that of the Scioto River appeared to be constant at 0.7093 =±= 0.0003 within the precision of the measurement.
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    A Study of Blackbird Repeats at a Decoy Trap
    (1970-05) Burtt, Harold E.; Giltz, Maurice L.
    The tendency for banded birds to "repeat", i.e. re-enter a decoy trap, is greatest for Grackles, followed by Cowbirds, Red-wings, and Starlings in that order. This finding is based on 6477 repeats contributed by 29,479 birds. The species differences are statistically significant (p<.01). Analysis of seasonal variables tends to minimize their contaminating effect. From an explanatory standpoint, the comparative stability of the species samples may be an intervening variable, but the basic cause of the inter-specific differences appears to be in the field of what is here called personality.
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    Book Review
    (1970-05)
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    Eutrophication of Northeastern Ohio Lakes. I, Introduction, Morphometry, and Certain Physico-Chemical Data of Dollar Lake
    (1970-05) Cooke, G. Dennis; Kennedy, Robert L.
    Dollar Lake in Portage County, Ohio, has a volume of 86,400 cubic meters and an area of 22,212 square meters. The average depth is 3.89 meters, the maximum depth is 7.5 meters. Maximum width of the lake is 140 meters, the maximum length 215 meters. Except for brief periods in spring and fall, deep waters are depleted of dissolved oxygen. Secchi Disc transparency is frequently below one meter. Massive blooms of algae are often observed. The lake stratifies thermally in April, circulates in October, and restratifies in December after ice formation. Spring circulation occurs in March. Dollar Lake is a dimictic, second-class, eutrophic lake.
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    Fresh-Water Mollusca of the Finger Lakes Region of New York
    (1970-05) Harman, Willard N.; Berg, Clifford O.
    A study of the molluscan fauna in central New York State has provided information on the distribution of fresh-water mollusks in that region, and on the species composition of snails and pearly fresh-water mussels in the major Finger Lakes and thirteen additional lakes and reservoirs in the Oswego River drainage basin. The data are based on 120 collections taken by hand picking, sieving, and the utilization of diving equipment. Small isolated upland lakes (Dryden, Cazenovia, Como, Panther, Kasoag Lakes), meromictic lakes (Fayetteville Green, Round, and Clark Reservation Lakes), and reservoirs with abnormal silt content and frequently fluctuating water levels (Jamesville and DeRuyter Reservoirs) support only a few species of mollusks. In the meromictic lakes in particular, empty shells collected are believed to represent former molluscan populations whose shells are preserved by the calcium-rich waters. Morphometrically oligotrophic lakes on the major waterways (the seven largest Finger Lakes) possess moderate numbers of molluscan species. In contrast, the shallow lakes of the limestone belt that are in direct communication with the larger rivers have the greatest species diversity. A table is included that shows the distributions of the species of mollusks collected in these bodies of water, distinguishing between living and dead representatives.
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    Fungi Associated with the Activated-Sludge Process of Sewage Treatment at the Lebanon, Ohio, Sewage-Treatment Plant
    (1970-05) Cooke, William Bridge
    Samples of materials in various stages of sewage treatment were obtained at monthly intervals between October, 1967, and April, 1968, from the Lebanon, Ohio, sewage-treatment plant. From both secondary and tertiary processes, a total of 93 species or species groups of fungi, including filamentous and yeast-like types, was recovered. Methods of sampling and isolation techniques, and data for several chemical and physical measurements made on the samples are presented. Comparisons of bacterial and fungal populations tested show that, on the basis of colonies recovered per ml of sample, effluent from the activated sludge aerator yielded 41 bacteria to one fungus, in contrast to a ratio of 1430 bacterial cells to one fungus cell in raw sewage. Many of the more common species of fungi present in the Lebanon sewage-treatment plant have also been recovered from similarprocess materials in sewage-treatment plants at Dayton, Ohio, a number of sewage-treatment plants in the Chicago, Illinois area, a small waste-stabilization pond system in a different watershed near Lebanon, and from other sewage-treatment plants elsewhere. Fungi, being reducer organisms, are admirably adapted to a habitat in which their assimilative cells are continually bathed in a nutrient medium such as that offered by sewage in the process of treatment by the activated-sludge process.
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    Front Matter
    (1970-05)