Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 68, Issue 4 (July, 1968)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (946KB)

Increasing Reliability and Validity in Juvenile Delinquency Research
Balogh, Joseph K. pp 193-202
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1001KB)

Book Notices
pp 202-202
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (129KB)

Symposium on Population Pressure and Solutions for this Problem : Foreword
Diller, Oliver D. pp 203-203
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (66KB)

The Tidal Wave of People
Bush, Monroe pp 204-208
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (529KB)

Family Planning Programs in Asia
Dixon, M. S., Jr. pp 209-213
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (549KB)

Basic Ecological Principles as Related to Population Explosion
Gilbert, Gareth E. pp 214-218
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (570KB)

Population Control as a Motivational Problem
Groat, H. Theodore; Perry, Joseph B., Jr. pp 219-225
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (733KB)

Book Notice
pp 225-225
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (96KB)

Notes on the Natural History of the Leeches (Hirudinea) on the George Reserve, Michigan
Sawyer, Roy T. pp 226-228
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (204KB)

Response of the Guinea Pig Heart to Hypothermia
Wilber, Charles G.; Zeman, Frances J. pp 229-233
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (333KB)

A New Species of Batyle from Utah (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)
Knull, Josef N. pp 233-234
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (660KB)

Radiocarbon Dates on and Depositional Environment of the Wasaga Beach (Ontario) Marl Deposit
Farrand, W. R.; Miller, Barry B. pp 235-239
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (458KB)

A Comparative Study of Antioxidants in Color Preservation of Fish
Gerrick, David J. pp 239-240
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (156KB)

The Ohio Academy of Science : Officers, Committees, and Academy Representatives for 1968-69
pp 241-245
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1968 Education Committee Report : Suggested Certification Requirements for Science Teachers
pp 246-255
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Circulation of the Ohio Journal of Science by States and Countries
pp 256-256
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Back Matter
pp 999
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    Back Matter
    (1968-07)
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    A Comparative Study of Antioxidants in Color Preservation of Fish
    (1968-07) Gerrick, David J.
    Fifteen commercial antioxidants were evaluated as color preserving agents in fish. Erythorbic acid (Miles Lab.) at a concentration of 1% in 10% formalin proved to maintain all colors studied in near natural conditions for more than two years. Ionol CP-40 (Shell Chemical Company) 1% was successful for red-color preservation for two years. Limited success in preserving red was also experienced with Antioxidant 221 (Greef Company) 0.1%, Antioxidant 703 (Ethyl Corporation) 1%, and Dillydap (Carlisle) 0.1%. All other agents failed to maintain color beyond that of formalin controls, failure in most cases being attributed to antioxidant insolubility. Isopropyl alcohol was ineffective as a vehicle for antioxidants used in biological color preservation.
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    Radiocarbon Dates on and Depositional Environment of the Wasaga Beach (Ontario) Marl Deposit
    (1968-07) Farrand, W. R.; Miller, Barry B.
    Marl and carbonized organic material, deposited during the Nipissing Great Lakes stage, rests in direct superposition on lower Algonquin (Payette ? stage) beach gravels, at Wasaga Beach, Ontario. Five radiocarbon dates from the marl, (M-1024) 5840±350 B. P., (M-1025) 5270±350 B. P., (M-1026) 5740±250 B. P., (M-1027) 12,250±150 B. P., and (M-1028b) 20,000±2,000 B. P., vary widely and apparently show the effect of contamination by the addition of "dead" carbon from adjacent Paleozoic carbonate rocks. A sixth date, (M-1028a) 5120±400 B. P., obtained from a charcoal layer on top of the gravel, is believed to be correct and records a time near the end of the interval during which waters were rising to the Nipissing level from the preceeding low Stanley stage. The marl deposit has yielded a molluscan fauna consisting of 22 species. The mollusks indicate a quiet, lacustrine environment, with abundant aquatic vegetation. Plant materials from these deposits were too highly degraded to provide much useful paleoecologic information.
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    A New Species of Batyle from Utah (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)
    (1968-07) Knull, Josef N.
    Specimens of a cerambycid belonging to genus Batyle, collected on Compositae 20 miles east of Escelante, Garfield Co., Utah, and sent for identification, are identified as belonging to a new species, B. knowltoni. The black color, short antennae, coarse dorsal punctures, and black pubescence distinguish it from other species in this genus.
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    Response of the Guinea Pig Heart to Hypothermia
    (1968-07) Wilber, Charles G.; Zeman, Frances J.
    Electrocardiograms were obtained from guinea pigs acclimatized to 8°C and 22 °C respectively and then observed at 4°-5°C. No differences were recorded in cardiac responses to cold in guinea pigs from the two acclimatization temperatures. Heart rate decreased linearly with body temperature. Various durations on the ECG record varied non-linearly with temperature: y = a+b/(x-c), where y is duration, e.g. T wave, x is colonic temperature in °C, and a and b are constants, giving respectively the value of y when x is 0°C and the slope of the line relating body temperature to y. The Qi0 value of the heart rate varies with temperature.
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    Notes on the Natural History of the Leeches (Hirudinea) on the George Reserve, Michigan
    (1968-07) Sawyer, Roy T.
    The local distribution and relative abundance of the leeches of the E. S. George Reserve, located in southeastern Michigan, were investigated. Fourteen species of leeches were found on the Reserve, five of which are new to Michigan and one is new to the United States.
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    Book Notice
    (1968-07)
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    Population Control as a Motivational Problem
    (1968-07) Groat, H. Theodore; Perry, Joseph B., Jr.
    Small-family norms in industrial societies, and large-family norms in developing societies, present quite different motivational problems respecting population control. In the former, means are now more important than motives, while in the latter just the opposite is true. Yet programs of family planning in developing nations continue to operate with the assumption that means are more important than motives. Results of crosscultural research on the social and psychological factors affecting fertility may serve better than clinic-based efforts, in the long run, to reverse the present rapid population growth in developing societies.
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    Basic Ecological Principles as Related to Population Explosion
    (1968-07) Gilbert, Gareth E.
    The serious human problems related to the population explosion are human ecological problems, and their solutions require judicious use of basic ecological principles. Most unfortunately, however, such principles are frequently either unknown, or not utilized, by those in authority within our world societies. A few of these principles are herein discussed, especially as they relate to the establishment of organic communities. The initial establishment of such communities is characterized by stresses so great and varied that death is the rule and survival the exception. A world-wide human community is currently being established and, if man again follows his animal instincts, he will experience death on a scale beyond current imagination. It is therefore proposed that a massive ecological research program be established concerning man of planet earth. Hopefully such a program would provide a sufficient understanding of man that he would develop in a constructive rather than a destructive manner.
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    Family Planning Programs in Asia
    (1968-07) Dixon, M. S., Jr.
    The population explosion in Asia has reached crisis proportions. Fortunately many of the countries in Asia, as well as the developed countries in the West, recognize the severity of the crisis and are actively supporting Family Planning Programs to bring contraception education and supplies to the populace. The Programs are still in their infancy, but some of them (Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and Pakistan) have made great strides. Experts differ in their long-range predictions for the success of the movement, but all feel that it is essential to the future of mankind. Because of the early success in several countries, and the expectation of new simple and inexpensive methods of contraception, there is reason for guarded optimism.
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    The Tidal Wave of People
    (1968-07) Bush, Monroe
    Thesis: " . . . the unprecedented growth in human population holds out the warning that in the final quarter of this chaotic century the accumulated effect of this increase will create a devastating upheaval in the social order of the entire human family . . . ." The rate of the world's population growth has increased spectacularly in recent centuries. Three hundred million people were living at 1 A.D.; in 1700 years this figure doubled to 600 million; by 1900, it had more than doubled again to 1,600,000,000 in 200 years; within only 60 years, it had doubled again to 3 billion plus. The present prospect is that by the year 2000, world population will double again to 6 billion plus. This rapid growth is not the result of an increased birth rate, but of a decline in the death rate, due to agricultural and industrial revolutions, and particularly to the impact of scientific technology. The 1966 world growth rate of two percent, in the face of a food production increase of only one percent, aggravates the threat of starvation. An anticipated rapid decline in the death rate of developing countries will bring increased rates of growth, unless widespread starvation intervenes. There is little prospect of an early decline in high birth rates. The situation in the United States is much less ominous. Here the birth rate fell from 55 per 1000 persons in 1820 to 18.4 births per 1000 persons in 1934—without a significant use of modern contraceptive techniques. Despite this drop in the birth rate, the population of the United States increased 40 times, from 4 million to 160 million, in 180 years. The growth was the consequence of a death rate that fell from an estimated 25 per 1000 in 1800, to 17.2 in 1900, to a low of 9.5 today. United States population hopefully may stabilize by year 2000-2025 at 300-350 million, based on the most favorable estimates. Meanwhile, world population is estimated to climb to 6-7.5 billion by the year 2000. The main problem in the United States will be the quality of life in the face of this increased congestion. In the rest of the world, the problem will be physical survival, the effect of which, on domestic United States, is difficult to forecast.
  • Item
    Book Notices
    (1968-07)
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1968-07)