Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 78, Issue 5 (September, 1978)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
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Announcements
pp. 238-238
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (62KB)

Some Observations on Geographic Research in China
Noble, Allen G.; Ma, Laurence J. C. pp. 239-244
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (493KB)

Estimation of Explosive Hazard by Computer
Treweek, Dale N.; Pardue, William M.; Hoyland, James R.; Alexander, Carl A.; Seaton, William H.; Freedman, Eli ; pp. 245-254
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (603KB)

Vegetational Changes on an Oldfield in Southeastern Ohio
Barcus, Brenda L.; McConnell, Charles T.; Wistendahl, Warren A. pp. 255-258
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (302KB)

Contractile Filament Stress: Comparison of Different Disease States in Man
Phillips, Chandler A.; Grood, Edward S. pp. 259-266
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (593KB)

Photosynthetic Response of Soybeans with Genetically Altered Chlorophyll
Cappy, James J.; Noble, Reginald D. pp. 267-271
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (374KB)

Descriptive Mineralogy of Pugh Quarry, Northwestern Ohio: Sphalerite
Parr, David F.; Chang, Luke L. Y. pp. 272-279
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Brief Note New Distribution Records of Cordylophora Lacustris and Craspedacusta Sowerbyi (Coelenterata) in Southern Illinois
Lipsey, Louis L., Jr.; Chimney, Michael J. pp. 280-281
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Brief Note Immigration by White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus Leucopus): Absence of Females
Vessey, Stephen H.; Mitchell, Lee E. pp. 282-283
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Necrology
pp. 284-288
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Back Matter
pp. 999
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    Back Matter
    (1978-09)
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    Necrology
    (1978-09)
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    Descriptive Mineralogy of Pugh Quarry, Northwestern Ohio: Sphalerite
    (1978-09) Parr, David F.; Chang, Luke L. Y.
    The Devonian rocks at Pugh Quarry have three distinct types of sphalerite (banded massive, spheroidal, and tiny euhedral). Occurrence of the banded massive sphalerite is restricted to the mineral zone, predominantly as blebs in marcasite. The color of banded sphalerite ranged from nearly colorless to various hues of yellow. The replacement of banded sphalerite by marcasite was observed. The spheroidal sphalerite occurred in association with marcasite of euhedral habit. The spherules were small, the largest no greater than 1 mm across. Where present in great profusion, the sphalerite spherules merged together forming botryoidal surfaces. The euhedral sphalerite occurred in the voids of the sponge-like and stromatolitic dolostone below the mineral zone, and in a layer of soft laminated mud associated with the dolostone. The euhedral sphalerite was predominantly red-brown, and no crystals larger than 1 mm in maximum dimension were observed.
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    Photosynthetic Response of Soybeans with Genetically Altered Chlorophyll
    (1978-09) Cappy, James J.; Noble, Reginald D.
    The photosynthetic response of soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Strain T219) at the start of a photoperiod showed that both normally pigmented plants (dark green) and chlorophyll-deficient plants (light green) had an induction period averaging 6 min, before a net CO2 uptake could be measured. The induction period was followed by a rapid increase in photosynthesis until a maximum rate was reached after 15 min and then gradually declined. Both chlorophyll content and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity were greatest in dark green plants. Plants tested at mid-day exhibited the highest carboxylase activity and plants assayed at mid-night the lowest activity. During the first 5 min of illumination (following a 12 hr dark period) the carboxylase activity increased 1.5 times in dark green and 1.9 times in light green plants. This indicated that initiation of the photoperiod enhanced ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity.
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    Contractile Filament Stress: Comparison of Different Disease States in Man
    (1978-09) Phillips, Chandler A.; Grood, Edward S.
    Cardiac catheterization data on 39 patients was classified in 5 cardiovascular groups: normal, compensated volume overload, decompensated volume overload, compensated pressure overload, and congestive cardiomyopathy. Both the Lagrangian stress and contractile filament stress for the circumferential axis and the longitudinal axis were computed over a complete cardiac cycle. Contractile filament stress was 24% higher than Lagrangian stress in the circumferential direction, and 43% higher than Lagrangian stress in the longitudinal direction. The percent difference in stress between the contractile filament stress and Lagrangian stress was greatest for patients with pressure overload, and least for patients with compensated volume overload. No significant difference in calculated wall stress was noted between the normal group and the 4 pathological groups. Circumferential velocity of the contractile element occurring at peak stress was plotted as a function of peak contractile filament stress and patients with compensated pressure overload exhibited high values of both velocity and peak stress. Patients with congestive cardiomyopathy showed low values of both velocity and peak stress. Circumferential velocity of the contractile element occurring throughout the cardiac cycle was plotted as a function of both the instantaneous Lagrangian stress and the instantaneous contractile filament stress, resulting in 2 stress-velocity curves for each patient. The value of the maximum velocity extrapolated from either stress-velocity curve was approximately the same, but the maximum stress extrapolated from the contractile filament stress-velocity curve was significantly higher than the maximum stress extrapolated from the Lagrangian stressvelocity curve. The product of peak contractile filament stress in the circumferential direction times heart rate was a clinically useful index of myocardial oxygen consumption, and predicted a lower rate of oxygen consumption than did the product of peak developed stress times heart rate.
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    Vegetational Changes on an Oldfield in Southeastern Ohio
    (1978-09) Barcus, Brenda L.; McConnell, Charles T.; Wistendahl, Warren A.
    Former agricultural land in Strouds Run State Park was sampled by the quadrat method in 1962 and again in 1975. Comparisons of data show a 31% decrease in herbaceous plant cover with only a 6% increase in shrub cover, but with a shift in species composition. Stem density of trees (^2.5 cm dbh) increased by a factor of 3.2. Indexes of similarity reveal that the field has become increasingly similar to the adjacent forest during the 13-year interim between study dates.
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    Estimation of Explosive Hazard by Computer
    (1978-09) Treweek, Dale N.; Pardue, William M.; Hoyland, James R.; Alexander, Carl A.; Seaton, William H.; Freedman, Eli
    Four parameters from the American Society for Testing and Materials' computer program CHETAH were used to predict energy hazard potential, as denned by consensus grading, into three stability (self-reactivity) categories—nonhazardous chemicals, chemicals capable of hazardous polymerizations or decompositions, and explosives. Out of 34 chemicals for which there was consensus agreement, 31 were correctly assigned to their known classes to yield a total error of 9%—all overestimated. An additional 11 chemicals for which the consensus ratings disagreed were also classified, and appeared to be consistent with one or the other consensus ratings. The addition of two other parameters, heat of polymerization and resonance stabilization of the free radical, reduced the error to one chemical. Classification of over a hundred chemicals, for which the ASTM has compiled experimental shock sensitivity data, falls into 2 categories: nonexplosives and explosives. Using the 4 CHETAH parameters and one structural parameter resulted in total error of about 5%, with the majority of the error being overestimation of hazard potential. It is concluded that the CHETAH program will estimate the self-reactivity hazard of any organic chemical (with 3 or more carbon atoms) with nil underestimation error, and less than 4% overestimation error.
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    Some Observations on Geographic Research in China
    (1978-09) Noble, Allen G.; Ma, Laurence J. C.
    Contacts between Western and Chinese scientists have been minimal during the last 28 years. The visit of the 10 man geography delegation of the Ohio Academy of Science in August 1977 may signal a change of Chinese policy toward expanded scientific contacts. Chinese geographical studies tend to be applied rather than theoretical and conceptual. Geographers frequently work on multidisciplinary study teams. Direction of research tends to be centralized. Suffering from a long period of social stigma and neglect, academicians appear to be returning to a position of useful service in Chinese society. Research conducted at the Institute of Geography, Peking, as well as elsewhere in China, is of high quality, although emphasis continues to be placed primarily on physical geography.
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    Announcements
    (1978-09)
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    Front Matter
    (1978-09)