Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 72, Issue 4 (July, 1972)

Permanent URI for this collection

Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (943KB)

Body Form and Gait in Terrestrial Vertebrates
Walker, Warren F., Jr. pp 177-183
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1253KB)

Aeshna Tuberculifera Walker, a New Ohio Record
Restifo, Robert A. pp 183-183
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (95KB)

Forest Communities of South Bass Island, Ohio
Hamilton, Ernest S.; Forsyth, Jane L. pp 184-210
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (2350KB)

Book Reviews
pp 210-210
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (95KB)

The Forest-Field Ecotone of Dysart Woods, Belmont County, Ohio
Toye, Ezekiel A.; Wistendahl, Warren A. pp 211-223
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1054KB)

Book Review
pp 223-223
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (34KB)

A Distribution-Free Discrimination Technique Applied to Typical Cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician) Limestones
Osborne, Robert H. pp 224-232
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (667KB)

Book Reviews
pp 232-234
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (305KB)

The Ohio Academy of Science : Officers, Committees, and Academy Representatives for 1972-73
pp 235-236
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (139KB)

Necrology
pp 237-240
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (410KB)

Book Reviews
pp 240-240
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (112KB)

Back Matter
pp 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1116KB)

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 13 of 13
  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1972-07)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1972-07)
  • Item
    Necrology
    (1972-07)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1972-07)
  • Item
    A Distribution-Free Discrimination Technique Applied to Typical Cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician) Limestones
    (1972-07) Osborne, Robert H.
    Multivariate discrimination procedures have been developed by which a given sample may be assigned to its correct population of origin on the basis of values it exhibits for the p variables observed. A discrimination method (Kendall, 1966) based on order-statistics is illustrated for possible use whenever the mathematical requisites for discriminant function analysis cannot be satisfied. The method described is distribution free, involves only counting, may be applied to variables measured on or above an ordinal scale, shows which variables are most important in the discrimination, and provides for a region of statistical indecision. The method was applied to petrographic measurements taken from 25 class 1-2 and 25 class 3 limestones collected from the Kope and Fairview Formations, exposed eastern Hamilton County, Ohio. Of eleven primary and derived variables observed, 68 percent of these limestones can be correctly assigned by the percentages of micrite, sparite, broken brachiopods, and crinoids, whereas the remaining 32 percent are included within a region of indecision. In this case, the discriminatory efficiency is not significantly increased by using more than the four variables listed above.
  • Item
    Book Review
    (1972-07)
  • Item
    The Forest-Field Ecotone of Dysart Woods, Belmont County, Ohio
    (1972-07) Toye, Ezekiel A.; Wistendahl, Warren A.
    The two tracts of forest constituting Dysart Woods, a mature oak forest, are bordered by secondary-growth forests and by fields which have been removed from agricultural use at different times. The vegetation along the margins of the mature forest and along the adjacent fields was studied to determine the existing vegetation and the trend of the migration of trees into the fields. Quadrat data for herbs, shrubs, and trees show vegetational trends characteristic of oldfield succession, but which vary from field to field. The arborescent vegetation indicates that the forest should become dominated by Fagus grandifolia and Acer saccharum as it expands into the fields. Quercus alba, a dominant in the forest, appears to lose that status within the expanding margins.
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1972-07)
  • Item
    Forest Communities of South Bass Island, Ohio
    (1972-07) Hamilton, Ernest S.; Forsyth, Jane L.
    Distribution of the tree species in present-day woodlots on South Bass Island appears to be related mainly to the stage in succession, which apparently correlates directly with the length of time available for reforestation since the initial extensive cutting. Such reforestation has occurred primarily in places where bedrock is so shallow that the land has been rejected for vineyard use or for human development. Substrate apparently does not control the distribution of the tree species, as bedrock throughout the forested areas of the Island, with one exception, is uniformly Silurian Put-in-Bay Dolomite, which is very shallow and locally exposed, and in which Romeo (Randolph) soils have been developed. The exception is the Box Elder-Green Ash woods, located on the northeast end of the Island, where bedrock is unusually deep (17 1/2 feet) and is covered by till, in which Hoytville (Catawba loam) soils have been formed. Six arborescent community types are recognized in the Island's remaining woodlots, the distributions of which have been mapped. Earliest in successional development of the communities is Young Hackberry, represented by Miller's Woods, followed by Hackberry- Blue Ash, represented by woodlots north of the lighthouse. Also early in succesion are the Box Elder-Green Ash community, as found on the northeast end of the Island, and the Cedar woods, represented by Heineman's Woods, which owes its great abundance of cedar to intensive grazing during the mid-1940's. A more mature type is the Sugar Maple-Hackberry-Basswood community, represented by Victory Woods and Cooper's Woods, and most mature of all is the Maple-Oak-Hickory type, as found in Duff's Woods. The more mature woodlots on the Island, where the dark, organic-rich Romeo soils are relatively thick, are characterized by a predominance of Acer saccharum in all size classes. Next in importance is Celtic occidentalis, which is present in most woods, but which predominates only in submature woods with abundant dolomite bedrock outcrops, where the Romeo soils are thinner. Tilia americana is usually third in importance, although its values are normally much lower than are those of the two dominant species, and it is generally represented by only a few large trees and no saplings. Other species, such as Prunus serotina, Morus alba, Juniperus virginiana, Fraxinus quadrangulata, Ostrya virginiana, Ulmus rubra, and Quercus muehlenbergii, have far lower importance values. Of these, the first four are regarded as successional, the first-named species being the earliest in the successional sequence, and the last four are considered to be minor members of the mature community. The scattered individuals of oaks (Quercus alba and Q. rubra) and hickories (Carya sp.) which occur in the Maple-Oak-Hickory community are the most difficult to explain, because of their limited distribution and because of the lack of any apparent correlation between their occurrence and either the substrate or the successional sequence which appears to control the distribution of the rest of the tree species. These oaks and hickories are believed to represent the normal climax associates of such stands, interpreted to occur in such restricted numbers only because of the extreme favorableness of the dark, organicrich soil on the shallow dolomite bedrock for Acer saccharum.
  • Item
    Aeshna Tuberculifera Walker, a New Ohio Record
    (1972-07) Restifo, Robert A.
  • Item
    Body Form and Gait in Terrestrial Vertebrates
    (1972-07) Walker, Warren F., Jr.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1972-07)