Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 76, Issue 2 (March, 1976)

Permanent URI for this collection

Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (696KB)

Announcements and Economics Section Formed
pp. 50-50
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (64KB)

Glacial Geology of Ohio in 1874 - The End of an Era
White, George W. pp. 51-56
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (527KB)

Geochemical Investigation of the Lower Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Ohio
Lo, Howard H.; Shong, Ahlene A. pp. 57-62
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (307KB)

Determination of the Blastema Cell Cycle in Regenerating Limbs of the Larval Axolotl, Ambystoma Mexicanum
McCullough, Willie D.; Tassava, Roy A. pp. 63-65
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (220KB)

Sulfur Isotope Composition of Some Sulfide and Sulfate Minerals in Ohio
Botoman, George; Faure, Gunter pp. 66-71
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (863KB)

Brief Note New Mastadon Finds from Southwestern Ohio
Ettensohn, Frank R. pp. 71-72
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (210KB)

Growth Rate, Life Span and Molting Cycle of the Crayfish Orconectes Sanborni
St. John, F. Lee pp. 73-77
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (351KB)

Changes in the Marsh and Aquatic Vascular Flora of East Harbor State Park, Ottawa County, Ohio, Since 1895
Moore, David L. pp. 78-86
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (640KB)

Respiratory Stress in Yellow Perch Induced by Subtoxic Concentrations of Diquat
Bimber, David L.; Boenig, Robert W.; Sharma, Moti L. pp. 87-90
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (256KB)

Brief Note Daphnia Swarms in the Harbor at Put-In-Bay
Boucherle, M. M.; Frederick, V. Ray pp. 90-91
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (246KB)

A New Genus, Sordana, for the "Gypona Sordida" Complex Homoptera: Cicadellidae
DeLong, Dwight M. pp. 92-95
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (250KB)

Brief Note Estimating Nymphal Populations of 17-Year Cicadas in Eastern Ohio, 1968
Forsythe, H. Y., Jr. pp. 95-96
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (208KB)

Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (796KB)

Browse

Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 14 of 14
  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1976-03)
  • Item
    A New Genus, Sordana, for the "Gypona Sordida" Complex Homoptera: Cicadellidae
    (1976-03) DeLong, Dwight M.
    The genus Sordana is discussed and a new species S. sordelta (collected in Bolivia) is described. A key to males of S. sordida (Stal), S. placida (Spangberg) and S. sor delta n-sp. is presented. All three species are so similar in form and coloration that they could be placed in the same species except for the differences in male genital structures.
  • Item
    Brief Note Daphnia Swarms in the Harbor at Put-In-Bay
    (1976-03) Boucherle, M. M.; Frederick, V. Ray
  • Item
    Respiratory Stress in Yellow Perch Induced by Subtoxic Concentrations of Diquat
    (1976-03) Bimber, David L.; Boenig, Robert W.; Sharma, Moti L.
    Two-year-old yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from Chautauqua Lake in western New York State were examined using short-term static bioassay techniques to determine possible deleterious subtoxic effects of Diquat (l,l'-ethylene-2,2'-dipyridylium dibromide), an aquatic herbicide commonly used in the lake. Under laboratory conditions, a significant level of respiratory stress was suffered by fish at Diquat concentrations similar to those applied to the lake during weed control measures and at concentrations significantly lower than those causing death (1 to 5 ppm).
  • Item
    Changes in the Marsh and Aquatic Vascular Flora of East Harbor State Park, Ottawa County, Ohio, Since 1895
    (1976-03) Moore, David L.
    Numerous changes in the marsh and aquatic flora of East Harbor State Park have occurred since 1895. Of the 89 species collected and identified before 1900, 22 are no longer present. This represents a loss of approximately 25% of the species originally reported by Moseley (1899) and Pieters (1901). The species lost would rise to 42%, if those species formerly abundant, but now rare, or occurring as one or two small, isolated populations disappear. Probable causes for these changes are wind and water erosion, fluctuating water levels, dredging, establishment and spread of species new to the park, and increase or decrease in abundance of species already present.
  • Item
    Growth Rate, Life Span and Molting Cycle of the Crayfish Orconectes Sanborni
    (1976-03) St. John, F. Lee
    Orconectes sanborni young were found to hatch in the spring and to undergo several closely spaced molts. These juveniles could be sexed by mid-summer. A molt occurring in the autumn of the first year was the beginning of a pattern of two molts per year, one in the spring and one in the summer or autumn, although the precise timing of these molts was variable. Both sexes usually reached sexual maturity by the autumn of the second year. At this time the males became form I (breeding) and the oocytes in the females began to increase in size. The maximum life span was found to be thirty-seven months.
  • Item
    Brief Note New Mastadon Finds from Southwestern Ohio
    (1976-03) Ettensohn, Frank R.
  • Item
    Sulfur Isotope Composition of Some Sulfide and Sulfate Minerals in Ohio
    (1976-03) Botoman, George; Faure, Gunter
    The isotopic compositions of sulfur in sulfide and sulfate minerals from northwestern Ohio vary by more than five percent. Sulfides (pyrite, sphalerite, and galena) from Gibsonburg and Clay Center have <534S values that are closely clustered about zero. Differences in the <534S values of coexisting sphalerite and galena suggest isotopic equilibration temperatures ranging from 43° to 63 °C. Pyrite and marcasite from Pugh Quarry at Custar are strongly enriched in 32S, but have significantly different <534S values. The sulfur of these minerals appears to have been fractionated by bacteria in marked contrast to the sulfur of pyrite, sphalerite and galena from Clay Center. The sulfur of marcasite is less enriched in 32S compared to coexisting pyrite, perhaps because marcasite is a secondary mineral formed from H2S produced by bacteria working on sulfate enriched in 34S compared to normal marine sulfate. The <534S of anhydrite from the Tymochtee Formation is 24.9 per mil, which is in good agreement with values for marine sulfate of Silurian age. The celestite from vugs in the Greenfield Formation is enriched in 34S relative to Silurian sulfate, indicating bacterial activity during or after dolomitization.
  • Item
    Determination of the Blastema Cell Cycle in Regenerating Limbs of the Larval Axolotl, Ambystoma Mexicanum
    (1976-03) McCullough, Willie D.; Tassava, Roy A.
    Total cell cycle time as well as time of S phase, G2+K> M phase, and Gi+/^ M phase was determined for blastema cells of 9 day nerve-dependent forelimb regenerates of larval axolotls. Nine days post-amputation the limbs had early cone blastemas which continued regeneration (on those larvae not fixed for histology) and by day 23 had 4 digit regenerates. The mean mitotic index for 9 day blastemas was 2.65% with 79.5% of the mitotic figures labeled 8 hrs post 3H-thymidine injection and 96% at 16 hours. Mean cycle time, as determined from the time from the 1st 50% intercept to the 3rd 50% intercept, was 40 hrs. The S phase, G2+K M, and G1+//2 M were 32 hrs, 5.6 hrs, and 2.4 hrs respectively.
  • Item
    Geochemical Investigation of the Lower Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Ohio
    (1976-03) Lo, Howard H.; Shong, Ahlene A.
    Fifty-four surface and near-bottom water samples from the lower Cuyahoga River were collected in the early spring of 1974. The distribution of K, Na, Ca, Mg and Zn with respect to water depth and location in the river was investigated. The average concentrations of K, Na, and Zn of the surface samples are slightly higher than those of the near-bottom samples. Correlation between element concentration and distance along the river indicates that Mg stays nearly constant and other elements fluctuate, particularly along the sections with local industries. The sharp drop of K and Na contents in near-bottom samples near the river's mouth could be caused by the intrusion of cooler lake water. pH values of water samples were slightly alkaline, ranging from 6.98 to 7.45. The average concentrations of K, Na, Ca, Mg, and Zn of the lower Cuyahoga River were 6.2, 60.8, 58.2, 15.0, and 0.020 ppm respectively. These values are considerably higher than those of the mid-lake water of Lake Erie.
  • Item
    Glacial Geology of Ohio in 1874 - The End of an Era
    (1976-03) White, George W.
    The Second Geological Survey of Ohio in 1869-73 produced more or less detailed reports and maps of the 88 counties of which 83 were published in 1873, 1874 and 1878. Each report included a shorter or longer section on Surface Geology, all organized in a similar fashion, as directed by J. S. Newbcrry, State Geologist. In 1874 Newbcrry summarized, in an 80-page essay, the knowledge of glacial deposits in Ohio and the current theories of their origin. The synthesis was developed from his own work and that of M. C. Read in northern and northeastern Ohio, G. K. Gilbert and N. H. Winchell in northwestern Ohio, and Edward Orton in southwestern Ohio. It was recognized that the bowlder clay was an ice sheet deposit. It was believed that erracties were concentrated on the surface and had been transported by icebergs in an inland lake, which was later drained. An extensive Forest Bed recorded a period of warmer climate, named by Orton an Interglacial Period, the first use of this term. The detailed descriptions, maps and sections are valuable records of the observations of these outstanding geologists as are the explanations they proposed for the Ouaternary history of Ohio.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1976-03)