International Journal of Rural Criminology: Volume 4, Issue 1 (July 2018)

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Issue DOI: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/86117

Editor's Introduction to Volume 4, Issue 1
Donnermeyer, Joseph F.
p. i
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Policing Peers and Selves between Law and Morality: A Socio-Legal Perspective on Managing Misconduct in Hunting
von Essen, Erica; Hansen, Hans Peter
pp. 1-26
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Violent Girls in the United States: Urban, Suburban, and Rural Differences
Rennison, Callie Marie; DeKeseredy, Walter S.
pp. 27-42
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Social Disorganization and Rural/Urban Crime Rates: A County Level Comparison of Contributing Factors
Ward, Kyle C.; Kirchner, EmmaLeigh E.; Thompson, Andrew J.
pp. 43-65
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Reimagining Rural Crime in England: A Historical Perspective
Smith, Kreseda; Byrne, Richard
pp. 66-85
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The Financial Impact of Registered Sex Offenders on Home Sale Prices: A Case Study of McLean County, Illinois
Navarro, John C.; Rabe-Hemp, Cara
pp. 86-109
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Rural Officer Habitus and Attitudes Toward Proposed Changes to Law Enforcement
Contessa, Jason; Wozniak, Jesse S.G.
pp. 110-134
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  • Item
    Editor's Introduction to Volume 4, Issue 1
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) Donnermeyer, Joseph F.
  • Item
    Policing Peers and Selves between Law and Morality: A Socio-Legal Perspective on Managing Misconduct in Hunting
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) von Essen, Erica; Hansen, Hans Peter
    Contemporary hunting is at great pains to assert a sovereign jurisdiction to state interference. Hunters sometime view laws as illegitimate and cultivate an informal normative order to guide conduct and to protect the integrity and outside representation of hunting in modernity. This involves policing selves and peers mainly from an ethic of fair chase, which is multifaceted. In this study, we interview hunters who reflect on the dynamics of the fair chase ethic as a guiding principle across various dilemmas, including technological gears, commodification of hunting, game allocation and social sanctions over transgressions. Consistent with our socio-legal theory, we observe hunting's moral and cultural perceptions of what constitutes fair chase in many situations is at odds with what is legally proscribed. Our final discussion elucidates the implications of hunters turning away from authorities in these situations, concluding with calls for deliberative culture that can re-integrate moral norms and formal laws.
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    Violent Girls in the United States: Urban, Suburban, and Rural Differences
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) Rennison, Callie Marie; DeKeseredy, Walter S.
    Though there is a rapidly growing social scientific literature on geographic variations in crime, it is still unclear whether rural girls are at greater or lesser risk of committing violent offenses than are their urban and suburban counterparts. This article uses 1992-2015 National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) data to help fill this research gap. The results show that there are significant differences in the rates of offending across geographic place. When considering offending rates for an aggregation of rape, sexual violence, robbery, aggravated assault and sexual assault, results indicate the highest rates of juvenile female offending in urban areas. The lowest juvenile female offending rates are found in rural areas. When excluding simple assault from the analysis (i.e., serious violence), juvenile female offending rates are highest in urban areas, but are similar in suburban and rural areas. While informative, this research highlights the need for greater research on this topic.
  • Item
    Social Disorganization and Rural/Urban Crime Rates: A County Level Comparison of Contributing Factors
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) Ward, Kyle C.; Kirchner, EmmaLeigh E.; Thompson, Andrew J.
    Social disorganization theory (Shaw & McKay, 1929) is a common explanation for crime. However, few studies have examined its significance for the explanation of crime in rural areas. The current study utilizes county level data from the United States Department of Health and Human Services to examine common characteristics of social disorganization for both rural and urban areas and which of these factors greater contribute to crime rates. The findings are consistent with previous research that finds significant differences between urban and rural areas regarding causes of crime. Overall, this study found that common measures of social disorganization such as income, racial heterogeneity, and migration do play a significant role in predicting the crime rate for both urban and rural areas. However, births and international migration play a significant role only in rural areas.
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    Reimagining Rural Crime in England: A Historical Perspective
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) Smith, Kreseda; Byrne, Richard
    Rural England is still perceived by many as a crime-free idyll, despite increasing evidence to the contrary. This paper provides a brief history of the emergence of rural crime as we currently understand it, from the dissolution of the monasteries under King Henry VIII (1536-1540), through to the early twentieth century. Some of the persistent myths surrounding rural crime that are particularly relevant to England will also be considered. This review shows that, despite being seen as a recent issue, rural crime in England has a long and chequered past. As a result, such misunderstandings may have led to the persistence of the myths surrounding rural crime, which means that the problems faced by rural communities continue unabated. By addressing these myths, whilst rural crime is not a recent issue, it has evolved into a modern phenomenon. This paper aims to show that rural crime research as a distinct academic field in England is a necessity.
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    The Financial Impact of Registered Sex Offenders on Home Sale Prices: A Case Study of McLean County, Illinois
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) Navarro, John C.; Rabe-Hemp, Cara
    This study extends the current sex offender and housing literature by examining whether the presence of registered sex offenders (RSOs) and sexual predators (SPs) influenced home sale values in a mixed rural/agricultural and urban community. Using ArcGIS, the residences of RSOs in McLean County, Illinois, and home sale transactions, along with property and neighborhood characteristics were geocoded. The associations of home sale values to the distance to the nearest RSO and SP, as well as, the concentrations of RSOs and SPs were examined. Results revealed that each foot increase between the sold home to the residence of the nearest RSO and SP was associated with an increase in home sale prices of 17.03 and 15.25 U.S. dollars, and the concentrations of two or more RSOs and SPs was associated with a reduction in home sale prices of 12,750 and 17,797 U.S. dollars. These findings inform the debate surrounding the requirements placed on sexual offender registration, community notification, and residency restrictions.
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    Rural Officer Habitus and Attitudes Toward Proposed Changes to Law Enforcement
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2018-07) Contessa, Jason; Wozniak, Jesse S.G.
    The field of policing has increasingly come under public scrutiny due to the events surrounding the deaths of citizens at the hands of officers. While this has spurred a call for changes to police training and practices, conspicuously absent from the conversation are the voices of officers themselves. This study addresses this lacuna by examining the attitudes and opinions of rural law enforcement, challenging the notion that the findings of studies concerning urban police can be generalized to rural departments. We argue that opposed to individualistic "rotten apples" theories, rural police behavior is best understood as patterned by the habitus of officers. This study explicates how the field experienced by rural law enforcement interacts with and modifies their response to the hypermasculine training and increasing militarization of American policing to produce an officer habitus distinct from that of their urban counterparts.