Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 87, Issue 5 (December, 1987)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (833KB)

Foreword
Janson, Richard W. pp. 142-142
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (146KB)

Biotechnology and Plant Productivity
Cullis, Christopher A. pp. 143-147
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1250KB)

Social and Legal Issues of Biotechnology
Hodgson, Clague P. pp. 148-153
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (667KB)

Economic Aspects of Agricultural Biotechnology
Wagner, Thomas E. pp. 153-157
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (721KB)

Teaching Biotechnology to Medical Students: Is There an Easy Way?
Steggles, Alan W. pp. 158-161
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (484KB)

Construction and Screening of a cDNA Library to Isolate Chicken Pituitary Hormone Genes
Foster, Douglas N. pp. 162-165
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1699KB)

Changing Market Evaluation of Biotechnology Firms
Janson, Richard W.; Pavlakovic, Vera K. pp. 166-169
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (363KB)

Ohio and South Carolina Business Attitudes Toward Biotechnology
Barton, Gary F. pp. 169-173
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (632KB)

Regulation for the Deliberate Release of Biotechnology Products
Howland, Hollis J. pp. 174-181
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1099KB)

What Biotechnology Has in Store For Us
Schneiderman, Howard A. pp. 182-185
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (505KB)

Some Implications of the Development of a High Biotechnology: The Perspective of Economic History
Giesbrecht, Martin Gerhard pp. 186-188
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (303KB)

Book Reviews
pp. 188-188
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Obituaries of Members of the Ohio Academy of Science: Report of the Necrology Committee, 1987
pp. 189-192
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The Ohio Academy of Science Officers, Committees and Academy Representatives for 1987-88
pp. 193-194
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (111KB)

Index to Volume 87
pp. 195-199
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (432KB)

The Ohio Journal of Science Table of Contents--- Volume 86
pp. 200-201
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (190KB)

Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (470KB)

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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1987-12)
  • Item
    Index to Volume 87
    (1987-12)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1987-12)
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    What Biotechnology Has in Store For Us
    (1987-12) Schneiderman, Howard A.
    Biotechnology has initiated a profound revolution in science with enormous technological and social consequences. The next 15 to 20 years will see biotechnology playing an increasingly important role in society in general. It will have impacts in the areas of human health, animal nutrition and plant agriculture. There will be 9 billion people on earth in 2025, and all the resources associated with biotechnology will be needed to enhance life in the next century.
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    Regulation for the Deliberate Release of Biotechnology Products
    (1987-12) Howland, Hollis J.
    The use of living organisms to make or modify products is ancient. The 1980s brought widespread use of novel genetic engineering techniques for modifying the hereditary characteristics of living organisms. In response, rulemakers formed a federal biotechnology policy.
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    Ohio and South Carolina Business Attitudes Toward Biotechnology
    (1987-12) Barton, Gary F.
    Recent developments in biotechnology have resulted in an increased interest in the monitoring of public attitudes and perceptions of this area of science. The audiences of interest have broadened to include not only the general public, but also various public opinion leadership groups and groups involved in decision-making.
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    Changing Market Evaluation of Biotechnology Firms
    (1987-12) Janson, Richard W.; Pavlakovic, Vera K.
    The stock market's valuation of selected public firms within the biotechnology industry has been analyzed to measure the performance of specific companies within a subset of the industry and the performance of this subset of the biotechnology industry within a larger universe of publicly traded companies. The objective of the study was to analyze the performance of the individual firm into components attributable to 1) the overall performance of the econony; 2) the industry performance compared with other industries; and 3) the specific performance of the individual companies compared with other firms within the industry. The method of analysis is independent of conventional profit-and-loss approaches. The stock market alone is used for the evaluations. The changes in market value are the sum of the three components adjusted for the size of the firm.
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    Construction and Screening of a cDNA Library to Isolate Chicken Pituitary Hormone Genes
    (1987-12) Foster, Douglas N.
    A chicken pituitary cDNA expression library has been constructed in the bacteriophage vector Agt 11 (methods for the bacteriophage DNA propagation, modification, ligation of the double-stranded cDNA insert and in vitro packaging are included.) The chicken pituitary cDNA library was screened with heterologous pituitary cDNA clones, and several putative chicken specific pituitary cDNA clones were isolated. These putative chicken specific cDNAs should prove most useful in determining the structural organization of the various pituitary hormone genes and help to better understand the molecular mechanisms of how these sequences affect growth, reproduction, and metabolism in the chicken. For educational purposes, the techniques of cDNA library construction and screening should allow advanced undergraduate students the opportunity to isolate specific cDNA clones of interest. After learning such methodologies, students should be in an advantageous position in the promising job market for recombinant DNA technology and for admission to the best graduate schools in the areas of cellular and molecular biology.
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    Teaching Biotechnology to Medical Students: Is There an Easy Way?
    (1987-12) Steggles, Alan W.
    The practice of medicine by future physicians is going to be greatly influenced by knowledge obtained from biotechnology. For instance, the development of DNA-based, prenatal diagnoses for inherited genetic disease or the availability of cloned protein hormones or vaccines will require that physicians have a different basic science background than their predecessors. This will necessitate changes in how the basic sciences are taught in medical schools. Suggestions are offered regarding the teaching of biotechnology to medical students.
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    Economic Aspects of Agricultural Biotechnology
    (1987-12) Wagner, Thomas E.
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    Social and Legal Issues of Biotechnology
    (1987-12) Hodgson, Clague P.
    Recent developments in molecular biology, immunology, tissue culture, and embryo manipulation have considerably enhanced man's ability to change living organisms. Potential benefits to mankind have led to multi-billion dollar per year investments involving over 200 new companies and many existing enterprises. Although various scientific problems involved in genetic engineering were insurmountable until recently, many of these problems have now been at least partially solved. Concerns have shifted somewhat toward issues involving: 1) the legality of patenting new life forms; 2) the question of the need for regulation; 3) safety; and 4) the public perception of science. The development of a high-tech industry around basic biological science has left some researchers with divided interests and has, at the same time, led to useful collaboration between industry and academe. Universities will soon face new tests of the basic premise of the 'universality' of knowledge gained from research as they attempt to patent and temporarily withhold publication of proprietary discoveries made with taxpayers' support.
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    Biotechnology and Plant Productivity
    (1987-12) Cullis, Christopher A.
    There is considerable potential for the application of biotechnology and genetic engineering to plant productivity. The basic manipulations for the isolation of genes and their transfer between species are well documented in model systems. However, more information is required concerning the basic processes governing plant productivity at the molecular level before practical applications can be achieved. In this paper, detailed consideration is given to (1) the use of restriction fragment polymorphisms as genetic markers, and (2) the molecular basis of hybrid vigor. In both cases it is clear that these techniques will be adjuncts to the already established methods for plant improvement but with far reaching potential for the future.
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    Foreword
    (1987-12) Janson, Richard W.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1987-12)