Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 80, Issue 6 (November, 1980)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (756KB)

Microbial Production of Methane From Wood and Inhibiition by Ethanol Extracts of Wood
Mink, Ronald; Dugan, Patrick R. pp. 242-249
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (582KB)

Succession in a Microbial Community Associated With Chitin in Lake Erie Sediment and Water
Warnes, Carl E.; Randles, Chester I. pp. 250-255
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Effect of Diet on the Growth and Survival of Adrenalectomized Rats Treated with Corticosterone
Cova, John L.; Leathem, James H. pp. 256-261
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (393KB)

Respiratory Activity of Isolated Chondrocytes with a Miniaturized Oxygen Electrade System
Lessler, Milton A.; Scoles, Peter V. pp. 262-268
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Cardiovascular and Metabolic Recovery of a Marathon Runner
Sawka, M. N.; Miles, D. S.; Glaser, R. M.; Knowlton, R. G.; Critz, J. B. ; pp. 269-272
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Wisconsin Versus Illinoian Age Soils: Their Effect on Agricultural Types in Ohio
Limbird, Arthur pp. 273-279
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Brief Note: Preliminary Investigation of Air Blisters in Pilea Cadierei
Downs, Brian D.; Vaughn, Kevin C.; Wilson, Kenneth G. pp. 280-281
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Brief Note: Intestinal Parasites of the Bluegill, Lepomis Macrochirus, and a Summary of the Parasites of the Bluegill from Ohio
Jilek, Reid; Crites, John L. pp. 282-284
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Table of Contents - Volume 80
pp. 285-286
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Index to Volume 80
pp. 287-288
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Back Matter
pp. 999
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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1980-11)
  • Item
    Index to Volume 80
    (1980-11)
  • Item
    Brief Note: Preliminary Investigation of Air Blisters in Pilea Cadierei
    (1980-11) Downs, Brian D.; Vaughn, Kevin C.; Wilson, Kenneth G.
  • Item
    Wisconsin Versus Illinoian Age Soils: Their Effect on Agricultural Types in Ohio
    (1980-11) Limbird, Arthur
    A portion of the area covered by Wisconsin and Illinoian age till plain soils in Ohio was studied to determine the influence of these contrasting adjacent soil regions on farming operations and agricultural types. The study indicated that the Wisconsin age soil region is a corn-livestock agricultural region that emphasizes corn production on highly productive soils. The Illinoian age soil region, however, is a mixed farming agricultural region that emphasizes soybean production to help overcome the limitations of the much less productive soils. The difference in the soils does affect differences in the agricultural types imposed on them.
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    Cardiovascular and Metabolic Recovery of a Marathon Runner
    (1980-11) Sawka, M. N.; Miles, D. S.; Glaser, R. M.; Knowlton, R. G.; Critz, J. B.
    Physiological recovery after a competitive marathon race was studied in a trained 43 year old male. The subject completed a progressive intensity treadmill test to exhaustion 6 days prior to, and 1, 3, 5, and 9 days post-marathon. Postmarathon values of cardiac output, stroke volume, heart rate and oxygen uptake during submaximal exercise were similar to pre-marathon values. Maximal blood lactate concentrations were decreased from pre-marathon levels by 50%, 58%, and 26% during the first week of recovery. Maximal blood lactate concentration, however, again achieved the pre-marathon level after 9 days of recovery. This concentration was believed to reflect the reestablishment of muscle glycogen stores comparable to pre-marathon levels. It was concluded that cardiovascular function demonstrated little after effects from the marathon, but at least one week was required for full metabolic recovery.
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    Respiratory Activity of Isolated Chondrocytes with a Miniaturized Oxygen Electrade System
    (1980-11) Lessler, Milton A.; Scoles, Peter V.
    A technique for the isolation of chondrocytes from the articular cartilage of rabbits was modified and improved to yield 5 to 20 x 106 viable cells per preparation. A YSI Model 5331 O2 sensor was modified so that it could rapidly respond in as little as 1 ml of medium. Mean oxygen uptake of cell samples showed that chondrocytes obtained from mature rabbits (1.33 /J! O2/107 cells/hr) had a higher oxidative activity than chondrocytes from immature rabbits (0.8 (A O2/107 cells/hr). Elevation of the incubation temperature from 25 °C to 35 °C increased the chondrocyte oxygen uptake approximately 20% but incubation at 37 °C tended to decrease oxygen uptake. It is evident that articular chondrocyte cells have a real, but fairly low, temperature sensitive oxidative metabolism.
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    Effect of Diet on the Growth and Survival of Adrenalectomized Rats Treated with Corticosterone
    (1980-11) Cova, John L.; Leathem, James H.
    Dietary protein content did not influence the life sustaining capacity of a daily 300 vg dose of corticosterone in adrenalectomized rats. A lower daily dosage of 150 ng was less effective when animals were fed a 5% casein diet. Depletion of body protein stores prior to adrenalectomy did not significantly alter the response pattern of animals maintained on a daily 300 fxg dose of corticosterone. Reducing the dietary protein content from 20% to 10% interfered with the capacity of the daily 150 /Jig dosage of corticosterone to support body weight gain in adrenalectomized rats. No significant changes in bod}^ weight were noted in adrenalectomized animals fed a 5% casein diet. Protein depletion had a favorable effect on this aspect of the hormone's activity when adrenalectomized rats were treated with the daily 300 ,ug dosage and refed 10% or 20% casein diets. Adrenalectomized animals maintained under these experimental conditions gained more weight than nondepleted animals fed the same diets.
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    Succession in a Microbial Community Associated With Chitin in Lake Erie Sediment and Water
    (1980-11) Warnes, Carl E.; Randles, Chester I. (Chester Irvin), 1918-1991
    Slides coated with reprecipitated chitin were buried in sediments from Lake Erie under laboratory conditions. Changes in the microbial community associated with the slide were noted over time, in depth of the water and sediment column, and in anaerobic and aerobic zones of the sediment. Bacterial activity in the overlying water was greatest after 2 to 7 days of incubation whereas sediment populations showed greatest numbers from 7 days (aerobic zone) to 13 days (anaerobic zone). Control slides showed no change in the time period used. Rod to ovoid forms predominated in the water regime and eventually (20 days) showed no difference from the control slides. Rod-shaped forms dominated sediment population up to approximately 10 days at which time vibrioid and/or spiral forms became the dominant flora until complete hydrolysis was evident.
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    Microbial Production of Methane From Wood and Inhibiition by Ethanol Extracts of Wood
    (1980-11) Mink, Ronald; Dugan, Patrick R.
    Mixed cultures of anaerobic bacteria fermented both coniferous and deciduous wood sawdust, with concomitant methane production. A consistently greater lag in methanogenesis was observed on coniferous as compared to deciduous wood. Arabinose, glucose, galactose, mannose, rhamnose and xylose when added to enrichment cultures had either no effect or a slight stimulation of CH4 production in the absence of added methane precursors (acetate, formate, CO2, H2). In the presence of added acetate, formate, CO2 and H2; arabinose, rhamnose and xylose appeared to stimulate mixed culture methanogenesis; whereas, xylose retarded methanogenesis in pure cultures of Methanobacterium formicicum. Alcohol extracts of either deciduous or coniferous wood were inhibitory to methanogenesis from either mixed cultures or from M. formicicum. The greater amount of alcohol extractives in coniferous wood may explain the greater lag in methanogenesis when compared to that of deciduous wood.
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    Front Matter
    (1980-11)