Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 84, Issue 5 (December, 1984)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (618KB)

University Student Understanding of Evolutionary Biology's Place in the Creation/Evolution Theory
Fuerst, P. A. pp. 218-228
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (763KB)

Relation of Water Table Depth and Soil Morphology in Two Clay-Rich Soils of Nortwestern Ohio
Zobeck, T. M. A., Jr. pp. 228-236
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1634KB)

The Winter of 1982-83 in Ohio
Hickox, David H. pp. 236-241
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (439KB)

Ethnic Transition in Slovenian-Croation Neighborhood in Clevelenad, Ohio, 1920-2000: A Quantitative Approach
Pavlakovic, Vera K.; Janson, Richard W. pp. 241-247
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (945KB)

Control of Nuisance Aquatic Plants with Burlap Screen
Jones, G. B.; Cooke, G. Dennis pp. 248-251
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (284KB)

An Annotated List of Leafhoppers (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) From Watercress Marsh, Columbiana County, Ohio
MacLean, David B. pp. 252-254
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (215KB)

Woodpecker Bills and Their Conformance to Hutchinsonian Ratios
Woods, P. E. pp. 255-258
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (270KB)

Predicting Board-Foot Tree Volume from Stump Diameter for Eight Hard-wood Species in Ohio
Heiligmann, R. B.; Golitz, M.; Dale, M. E. pp. 259-263
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (315KB)

Temperature and Humidity-Induced Shifts in the Flight Activity of Little Brown Bats
Lacki, Michael J. pp. 264-266
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (223KB)

Brief Note: Euchloe Olympia, A Butterfly New to Ohio
Riddlebarger, J. E. pp. 267-267
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (75KB)

Brief Note: A Currant New to Ohio: Ribes Triste Pall.
Bissell, J. K. pp. 268-269
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (115KB)

Book Reviews
pp. 269-270
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Obituaries of Members of the Ohio Academy of Science: Report of the Necrology Committee
pp. 271-277
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Officers, Committees and Academy Representatives for 1984-85
pp. 278-280
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Statement of Ownership, Manage-ment and Circulation
pp. 280-280
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Index to Volume 84
pp. 281-286
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Table of Contents – Volume 84
pp. 287-287
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Back Matter
pp. 999
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  • Item
    Back Matter
    (1984-12)
  • Item
    Index to Volume 84
    (1984-12)
  • Item
    Book Reviews
    (1984-12)
  • Item
    Brief Note: Euchloe Olympia, A Butterfly New to Ohio
    (1984-12) Riddlebarger, J. E.
  • Item
    Temperature and Humidity-Induced Shifts in the Flight Activity of Little Brown Bats
    (1984-12) Lacki, Michael J.
    The importance of ambient environmental conditions to flight activity in little brown bats, Myotis lucifugus, has received attention, but the influence of relative humidity has been largely ignored. Through the use of mist net captures, activity of male and female M. lucifugus were examined in relation to temperature and relative humidity. Activity of males was significantly greater under conditions of both higher temperature and relative humidity, suggesting that these bats alter their flight activity in response to changes in air saturation.
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    Predicting Board-Foot Tree Volume from Stump Diameter for Eight Hard-wood Species in Ohio
    (1984-12) Heiligmann, R. B.; Golitz, M.; Dale, M. E.
    Regression equations were developed to predict volume table values for merchantable gross volume from stump diameter for eight species of hardwood trees in south-central Ohio. Mesavage and Girard's volume tables were used to develop equations for both the Doyle and International lA log rules. Data for the study were collected in Scioto Co., Ohio. Regression equations were weighted by the inverse of estimated variances. The range in R2 was from 0.82 to 0.96. Both equations and tables are presented for each species and for combined equations.
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    Woodpecker Bills and Their Conformance to Hutchinsonian Ratios
    (1984-12) Woods, P. E.
    Culmen lengths of a bark-drilling guild were examined to evaluate the utility of Hutchinsonian ratios. The culmen lengths of species pairs which feed on relatively abundant intermediate size prey were nearly identical. Species pairs which fed on the relatively less abundant very small and very large prey species had large (1.35-1.47) culmen ratios. It is concluded that Hutchinsonian ratios may, if used with discretion, serve as useful indicators of potential competition but should not be assumed to be indirect evidence of competition.
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    An Annotated List of Leafhoppers (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) From Watercress Marsh, Columbiana County, Ohio
    (1984-12) MacLean, David B.
    Collections made in 1976 and 1977 at Watercress Marsh, Columbiana Co., Ohio, resulted in a total of 35 species of leafhoppers including four new state records. Most leafhopper species collected at this diverse wetlands are common inhabitants of marshes, bogs and wet sedge meadows and have eastern or transcontinental distributions.
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    Control of Nuisance Aquatic Plants with Burlap Screen
    (1984-12) Jones, G. B.; Cooke, G. Dennis
    Ten-ounce burlap was applied as a sediment cover in June 1982 to two plots on Lake Rockwell (Portage Co., Ohio). The burlap at one of the plots was treated with a rot-retarding material, Netset. Plant biomass on treated plots was compared to adjacent plots. The application of burlap was effective for seasonal control of aquatic plant growth on a site where material could be tautly secured to the reservoir sediments. It was less effective at a site with highly unconsolidated sediments. Burlap would have to be applied annually since it rotted during the summer even with preservative treatment. The material cost of burlap is about 15-50% of commercial screening products.
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    Ethnic Transition in Slovenian-Croation Neighborhood in Clevelenad, Ohio, 1920-2000: A Quantitative Approach
    (1984-12) Pavlakovic, Vera K.; Janson, Richard W.
    Ethnic composition has been quantified and subjected to Markovian analysis for a Slovenian-Croatian neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio, that has served as a gateway for immigrants for more than a century. Actual census data have been compared to values predicted by the stochastic assumption to assess the impacts of the great depression, the post-war wave of immigration, and the black riots of the 1960s. Second generation Slovenians and Croations are rapidly decreasing relatively as they move to suburban areas, but immigrants from Yugoslavia are increasing relatively while blacks and other races expand at advancing rates. If present trends persist, in the year 2000 immigrants from Yugoslavia will represent 34% and blacks 26% of the total population in the area. Other foreign born will approximate five percent and total foreign born will exceed slightly the native white. The gateway function of the neighborhood will probably remain intact for the remainder of this century.
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    The Winter of 1982-83 in Ohio
    (1984-12) Hickox, David H.
    The winter of 1982-83 in Ohio was quite unusual. December was extremely mild and rainy with several Ohio weather stations recording December and winter records for maximum temperatures. Temperatures remained above normal during January and February throughout Ohio while precipitation was below normal. Ohio experienced one of its mildest winters of the 20th century. The immediate cause of this mildness was a persistent flow of the jet stream from the west or southwest for much of the winter. The ultimate generator of the unusual weather was probably abnormally warm surface waters in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, commonly referred to as El Nino.
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    Relation of Water Table Depth and Soil Morphology in Two Clay-Rich Soils of Nortwestern Ohio
    (1984-12) Zobeck, T. M. A., Jr.
    Water table levels within the upper 165 cm of the soil and precipitation were measured over a three—yr period for two forested soils representative of clay-rich soils common throughout much of northwestern Ohio. The soils included very poorly drained Hoytville taxadjunct (fine, illitic, mesic Typic Haplaquept) and moderately well drained Glynwood (fine, illitic, mesic Aquic Hapludalf). A water table was observed from February to June in the Hoytville taxadjunct and from March to June in the Glynwood. The soils were also sampled and described in order to relate soil properties to observed water table depths. The Hoytville taxadjunct was dominantly gray throughout the subsoil, and the Glynwood had gray coatings only on ped surfaces. The gray soil matrix of the Hoytville taxadjunct formed in horizons where water tables were observed for as little as 1.5 months, and the gray coatings of the Glynwood formed in horizons where water tables were present for an average of only two weeks each year.
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    University Student Understanding of Evolutionary Biology's Place in the Creation/Evolution Theory
    (1984-12) Fuerst, P. A.
    A questionnaire was used to survey 2,387 students in 10 different science courses at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Students were questioned about their views on the creation/evolution controversy, especially their acceptance of the concept of Darwinian evolution and on the concept of equal time for creation science. Biology students in Ohio showed a surprisingly low level of acceptance for the theory of evolution, and by an 80%-to-20% rate favored the concept of equal time for competing theories of origins. Students with increased education in biology were significantly less likely to accept co-instruction of alternative theories of origins in high school. Only eight percent of students could correctly identify the concept of differential reproduction as being most consistent with Darwinian evolution, among a set of five choices. Twentyfive percent believe that scientists doubt the validity of evolution as a science, while 22% feel that teaching naturalistic theories of science may lead to a decay in American society. Age and college rank had no effect on students' answers when the amount of science education in biology was taken into account. Students who had been exposed to evolution during high school biology courses were more likely to accept the concept of Darwinian evolution. Those students who have experienced more education in biology tend to answer questions in a manner which is more favorable to evolutionary biology and less favorable to creationist ideas. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that current mass biological education is not very successful in conveying the scientific basis of evolutionary biology.
  • Item
    Front Matter
    (1984-12)