38th Hayes Advanced Research Forum (March, 2024)

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Arts
1st place: Dillon, Lucile
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2nd place: Chivington, Lauren
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3rd place: Flaksberg, Dominique Gedanke
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Biological Sciences
1st place: Hoskins, Emily
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2nd place: Coffman, Electra
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3rd place: Rushforth, Rebekah
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Business
1st place: Haltman, Cory
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2nd place: Shen, Mingnan
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3rd place: Rathjens, Jacob
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Education & Human Ecology
1st place: Lee, ZhiJee
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2nd place: Thomas, Carrie Anne
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3rd place: Han, Dasom
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Engineering
1st place: Connell, Rosalie
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2nd place: McClanahan, Gregory
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3rd place: Fietek, Carter
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FAES
1st place: Tatum, Jaden
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2nd place: Yan, Ming
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3rd place: Quijia-Pillajo, Juan
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Health Sciences
1st place: Ouyang, Lingyu
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2nd place: Dharmadhikari, Sayali
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3rd place: Pax, Kazune
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Humanities
1st place: Holroyd, Deanna
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2nd place: Lu, Ai Ling
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3rd place: Ramirez, Pedro Antonio Ortiz
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Mathematical & Physical Sciences
1st place: Lamantia, Kara
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2nd place: Turner, Wynne
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3rd place: Manley, Brandon
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Social & Behavioral Sciences
1st place: Nothnagle, Emily
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2nd place: Jewell, Courtney
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3rd place: Singer, Jill
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Poster Division: Biological & Health Sciences
1st place: Lubertozzi, Anna
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2nd place: Wedig, Jessica
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3rd place: Kromalic, Meredith
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Poster Division: FAES
1st place: Chen, Zhaozhe
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2nd place: Zhang, Yue
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3rd place: Voss, Danielle
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Poster Division: Engineering
1st place: Jawdekar, Tanay
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2nd place: Mayone, Sophia
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3rd place: Benavides, Maria Angelica Rincon
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Poster Division: Education & Human Ecology and Social & Behavioral Sciences
1st place: Wang, Lei
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2nd place: Viera, Kaitlyn
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3rd place: Howell, Allison
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Recent Submissions

Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
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    The Medicalization of Everyday Experiences as Symptoms: A Digital Ethnography of ADHD-related Social Media Content
    (2024-03) Holroyd, Deanna; Stevens, Maurice
    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is increasingly prevalent in American society (Smith, 2012), evident not only in rising diagnoses, but also in the recent increase of ADHD-related social media content. Much of this content presents the personal experiences of living with the disorder as an adult. While previous research into ADHD-related social media posts has explored levels of misinformation within the content (Yeung et al. 2022), it is still unknown exactly how content creators are presenting their experiences of having ADHD and their symptoms. This paper aims to explore just that, by adopting a digital ethnographic approach to examine ADHD-related Facebook, Instagram and TikTok posts and comments to discover how ADHD is presented and understood on social media. Throughout my 18-month-long digital ethnographic inquiry across these three social media platforms, I analyzed the discursive, memetic, and visual aspects of this ADHD-related content, paying close attention to the symptoms that are listed in these posts, and the general sentiment attached to the experiences that content creators share. I find that many of the ‘symptoms’ presented in this content (such as zoning out, being forgetful, fidgeting, etc.) are actually best understood as quotidian lived experiences of our neoliberal socio-cultural context, that are being reframed by content creators as medicalized diagnostic criteria – despite not being recognized as official symptoms or diagnostic criteria by medical professionals. This, I claim, helps create an environment in which almost anyone can understand themselves to have ADHD and self-identify as having the disorder. I also discover that much of this social media content rejects the notion of ADHD as a debilitating disorder and reframes it as a neurological ‘superpower’ and modern-day ‘life-hack’. As such, my research shows that ADHD-related social media content both medicalizes and glorifies everyday struggles, thus reducing ADHD to an online trend and personality trait that contributes to the delegitimization of the disorder. This paper therefore argues that, contrary to previous research on online health discourse, ADHD social media content is not simply a source of advocacy, awareness, and activism; rather, this vernacular discourse of embodied ADHD knowledge on social media is 1) actively changing widespread conceptions of what ADHD is, 2) challenges medical definitions of what it means to have ADHD in the 21st century, and 3) impacts who is considered an authoritative source of knowledge on mental health and the body. With this in mind, this paper makes several significant contributions to the fields of medical humanities, science and technology studies, and qualitative social media studies. Firstly, it highlights how the socio-political context of neoliberalism impacts what behavior becomes medicalized and what can be considered normative and disordered behavior. Secondly, the paper illuminates how digital and media technologies shape understandings of mental health and symptoms of disorders.
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    I Liked it Before it Was Cool: When and Why Consumers Signal Early Adoption of Popular Products
    (2024-03) Haltman, Cory; Donnelly, Grant E.; Reczek, Rebecca Walker
    Across three studies we provide evidence that individuals are driven to communicate to others that they had adopted a product before it diffused (i.e., "before it was cool"). As we find, this tendency (which we term early adoption signaling) occurs naturally when the situational context makes a person's adoption timing salient, and is additionally something that marketers can directly leverage to encourage word of mouth.
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    In planta evaluation of phosphorus solubilizing microorganisms using the TraitFinder digital phenotyping system.
    (2024-03) Quijia-Pillajo, Juan; Jones, Michelle
    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient with low availability for plant uptake. High media pH levels can cause the formation of insoluble compounds with calcium (Ca). Phosphorus solubilizing bacteria (PSB) can enhance P availability for plant uptake by producing organic acids to acidify the rhizosphere. The identification of PSBs requires both in-vitro and in-planta evaluations. In-vitro protocols allow for the screening of extensive bacterial collections, but the number of bacterial isolates that can be tested in the greenhouse is limited by the amount of space and time required to evaluate the plant responses to PSB inoculation. Digital phenotyping is an emerging tool for high throughput and precise evaluation of plant performance and health. This project aimed to evaluate the performance of plants inoculated with phosphorus solubilizing microorganisms (PSM) using digital phenotyping with the TraitFinder (Phenospex) Greenhouse system. Five PSM were tested in a greenhouse experiment with Marigold (Tagetes patula) 'Durango Orange,' Radish (Raphanus sativus) 'Cherry Belle,' and Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) 'Bush Beef Steak.' PSM treatments included: three bacteria from the Jones lab (OSU1, OSU2, and OSU3) and two microbial-based products (Lalrise Vita and MycoApply Endo). Plants were grown in a peat-based substrate and irrigated with 100 mg·L-1 N from a 15-0-15 fertilizer. P was provided weekly as insoluble Ca2(PO4)3 via drench. Lalrise Vita promoted growth in all plant species evaluated. Lalrise Vita also improved marigold health, which was assessed using the green leaf index (GLI), and plant senescence reflectance index (PSRI).
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    El Niño Enchances Snowline Rise and Ice Loss on the World's Largest Tropical Ice Cap
    (EGUsphere, 2024-03) Lamantia, Kara; Thompson, Lonnie
    Tropical glaciers are essential water resources in the central Andes as vital water resources and crucial climate indicators, currently undergoing rapid retreat. However, understanding their vulnerability to the combined effects of persistent warming, short-term climate phenomena, and interannual fluctuations remains limited. Here we automate mapping of key mass balance parameters on the Quelccaya Ice Cap (QIC), the world’s largest tropical ice cap. Using Landsat's near-infrared (NIR) band, we analyze snow cover area (SCA) and total area (TA) and calculate the Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR) and Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) over nearly 40 years (1985-2023). Between 1985 and 2022, the QIC lost ~46% and ~34% of its SCA and TA, respectively. We show that the QIC’s loss in SCA and rise in ELA are exacerbated by El Niño events, which are strongly correlated to the preceding wet season’s Ocean Niño Index (ONI). We observe lower levels of correlation to more recent El Niño events as anthropogenic climatic impacts overwhelm the natural forcing and continue to exacerbate loss at the QIC.
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    Modeling friendship formation, measuring peer effect and optimizing class assignment
    (2024-03) Wang, Lei; Blevins, Jason
    Our research leverages neural network method to approximate the functional relationship between students' own characteristics and their friendship preferences, providing valuable insights into the intricate processes of how students form connections. This approach allows for an examination of friendship dynamics beyond what traditional linear models can offer. Secondly, replacing the linear-in-means assumption with a more reasonable friendship weighted assumption, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of heterogeneous peer effects based on students' characteristics. This allows us to discern the varying impacts of peer influence across different demographic and behavioral dimensions, contributing to a deeper understanding of peer effect distribution. Lastly, through counterfactual analysis, we go beyond describing observed patterns and actively identify optimal class assignment strategies that maximize students' cognitive scores. This practical dimension of our research holds implications for educational policies and practices, offering actionable insights for educators and policymakers seeking to enhance student outcomes through thoughtful class assignments.
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    The Function of Risk: Breath, Gravity, and Play in STREB
    (2024-03) Dillon, Lucile; Zbikowski, Abby
    This research analyzes the function of extreme action and risk in the choreographic work of Elizabeth Streb. I question how extreme risk in choreography activates the bodies in the audience, calling them into a deeper empathetic experience than passive observation. Then, in this activated state of witnessing, does the choreography become actionable? While Streb distances herself from the aesthetics and priorities of Western modern dance, I argue that many of Streb’s critics frame her work inside of the concert dance paradigm. Then, many critics review her work from a visualist bias that only ogles at the work’s spectacularity. Streb advocates for her work as action, not dance, and thus I prioritize the vitality affects, or kinetic elements, of her work to see past the visual spectacle (Sklar 2008). This method of movement analysis allows for a reading of Streb’s work in its own language – we attend to what we hear and feel over what we see. Using the scholarship of Jean Thomas Tremblay (2022), Ann Cooper Albright (2019), and Janet O’Shea (2019), I trace breath, gravity, and play through two of Streb’s core action events: Little Ease (1991) and SEA (2018). This movement analysis reveals the weighted resilience of Streb’s work that does not transcend the inescapable forces laid upon bodies, particularly bodies that experience class-based and gender-based oppression, but persists with realism and endurance through them. The extreme action and risk of Streb’s work unearths more than a gasp or cringe but also activates a shift or new awareness in the witness's body that is rooted in the queer, working class consciousness of Streb’s movement cosmology.
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    Interrogating the viral dark matter of the rumen ecosystem with a global virome database
    (Springer Nature, 2024-03) Yan, Ming; Yu, Zhongtang
    The diverse rumen virome can modulate the rumen microbiome, but it remains largely unexplored. Here, we mine 975 published rumen metagenomes for viral sequences, create a global rumen virome database (RVD), and analyze the rumen virome for diversity, virus-host linkages, and potential roles in affecting rumen functions. Containing 397,180 species-level viral operational taxonomic units (vOTUs), RVD substantially increases the detection rate of rumen viruses from metagenomes compared with IMG/VR V3. Most of the classified vOTUs belong to Caudovirales, differing from those found in the human gut. The rumen virome is predicted to infect the core rumen microbiome, including fiber degraders and methanogens, carries diverse auxiliary metabolic genes, and thus likely impacts the rumen ecosystem in both a top-down and a bottom-up manner. RVD and the findings provide useful resources and a baseline framework for future research to investigate how viruses may impact the rumen ecosystem and digestive physiology.
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    Orbital Angular Momentum Small-x Evolution: Exact Results in the Large Nc Limit
    (2024-03) Manley, Brandon; Kovchegov, Yuri
    We construct an exact solution to the revised small-x orbital angular momentum (OAM) evolution equations derived in an earlier work. These equations are derived in the double logarithmic approximation (summing powers of the strong coupling constant with two logarithms of 1/x, with x the Bjorken x variable) and the large-Nc limit, with Nc the number of quark colors. From our solution, we extract the small-x, large-Nc expressions of the quark and gluon OAM distributions. Additionally, we determine the large-Nc small-x asymptotics of the OAM distributions to be a power law growth in 1/x with the intercept the same as obtained in the small-x helicity evolution, which can be approximated as 3.66074. This result is in complete agreement with the literature. Additionally, we calculate the ratio of the quark and gluon OAM distributions to the flavor-singlet quark and gluon helicity parton distribution functions respectively in the small-x region.
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    Patient-Informant Agreement in Reported Activities and Participation Depends on Aphasia Severity
    (2024-03) Jewell, Courtney; Harnish, Stacy
    Background: Participation in life situations has been identified by people with aphasia (PWA) as an ultimate outcome of rehabilitation and is often measured with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) or informant-report measures. It is known that PWA and informants do not always produce similar scores on measures of activities and participation. However, systematic differences between patients and informants, and the causes of these differences, are not well understood. Here, we investigated these differences as a function of language impairment, perceived level of activity and participation success, and depressive symptoms. Methods: Participants were 29 PWA-informant dyads who completed a performance-based language assessment and three measures related to different aspects of activities and participation. Outcome variables were PWA-informant difference scores in the activities and participation measures. Results: PWA ratings of activities and participation were not statistically significantly associated with performance-based language severity. Hierarchical regression models with both language impairment and informant-report scores as predictor variables explained 53-71% of the variance in PWA-informant difference scores (all p<.05). In particular, mild communication challenges were associated with the PWA reporting significantly worse participation than the informant perceived. In contrast, more severe communication challenges were associated with the patient reporting significantly better participation than the informant perceived. Discussion: These findings highlight the importance of measuring participation by PROM. The patient’s experience of participation is not related to their level of language impairment and is predictably different from their care partners perspective. As others have reported also, “mild” aphasia is not so mild to the PWA. Similarly, “severe” may not be so severe to the PWA. Further research is needed to connect these findings with counseling and caregiver education. Research on responses processes (e.g., response shift) is also warranted.
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    Investigating the Impact of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Upper Extremity Motor Function for Patients Post-Stroke: A Systematic Review
    (2024-03) Kromalic, Meredith; DeMott, Lori
    Background: Stroke continues to be a leading cause of disability in the United States largely due to unilateral motor deficits which create a significant barrier to daily functional abilities. Several therapists in the outpatient rehabilitation setting utilize various motor retraining interventions such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation; however, these interventions may be missing a crucial component in motor recovery: somatosensory stimulation. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) provides constant sub-motor threshold stimulation that helps the brain reintegrate crucial information regarding the tactile sensation and the body’s position in space via the afferent pathway. Objective: To investigate the impact of upper extremity (UE) TENS on motor recovery outcomes in patients in the subacute to chronic stages of stroke recovery. Search Method: Pre-selected search terms were entered into various peer-reviewed research databases including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, and SCOPUS. Articles from each search were imported into a reference manager where all duplicates were removed. Selection Criteria: Inclusion criteria consisted of peer-reviewed, randomized control trials conducted with adult post-stroke patients in the subacute to chronic stages in the outpatient rehabilitation setting utilizing UE TENS as the primary intervention. Data Extraction and Analysis: Two reviewers independently voted to include/exclude each article, and conflicts were resolved by a third independent reviewer. Each included article was assessed for methodological quality and individual risk of bias. Finally, the quality of evidence and strength of recommendation were determined by evaluating each outcome across studies. Results: Of 1422 studies screened, 6 randomized control trials met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present review. Each of the studies paired UE TENS with a version of task- specific training. All but one study found a significant difference between experimental and control groups for at least one of the UE motor function outcomes measured, favoring the TENS group(s). Of the 6 included studies, 2 were assigned a 2a level of evidence, and the remaining 4 were assigned a 2b level of evidence. 5 of the studies received an overall rating of low risk of bias and 1 study received an overall rating of high risk. The use of TENS was given a low- moderate quality of evidence supporting its use for improving UE motor function and received an overall recommendation rating of Weak+. The evidence revealed the following as potentially the most effective active ingredients: high-frequency TENS for 30-60 minutes 3-5 times per week with electrode placement proximally (over elbow/wrist extensors) as well as distally (over the hand and fingers) and paired with task-specific training. Implications: The results of this systematic review indicate that the use of UE TENS for hemiparetic post-stroke patients may be an effective intervention to expedite UE motor recovery; however, further research is needed to determine to most effective electrode placement, length/frequency of stimulation, time of stimulation (before, during, or after task-specific training), and stage of recovery to provide TENS intervention.