Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 97, Issue 4 (September, 1997)

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Front Matter
pp. 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (667KB)

Nonglacial Surficial Processes during the Early and Middle Wisconsinan Substages from the Glaciated Allegheny Plateau in Ohio
Szabo, John P. pp. 66-71
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1865KB)

Comparison of White Crappie Populations in Diked and Undiked Lake Erie Wetlands
Markham, Carol A.; Lynch, William E., Jr.; Johnson, David L.; Petering, Raymond W. pp. 72-77
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (552KB)

Survey and Analysis of the Scioto Brush Creek Drainage Fish Fauna of Southern Ohio
Cavender, Ted M.; Rice, Daniel L. pp. 78-85
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (1567KB)

A Survey of the Branchiopod Crustaceans of Ohio
Weeks, Stephen C.; Marcus, Vivien pp. 86-89
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (470KB)

cpDNA of Acer saccharum and Acer nigrum are Very Similar
Skepner, Adam P.; Krane, Dan E. pp. 90-93
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (404KB)

Book Reviews
Attenborough, David pp. 94-95
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (371KB)

Back Matter
pp. 999
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (873KB)

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    Back Matter
    (1997-09)
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    Book Reviews
    (1997-09) Attenborough, David
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    cpDNA of Acer saccharum and Acer nigrum are Very Similar
    (1997-09) Skepner, Adam P.; Krane, Dan E.
    The number of species and sub-species that comprise North American sugar maples has remained in dispute since their first characterization over 100 years ago. The taxonomic distinctiveness of Acer nigrum (black maples) and A saccharum (sugar maples) has been particularly controversial. An analysis of the nucleotide sequences from a non-coding region of the chloroplast genome of Ohio black and sugar maples suggests that these trees are genetically very similar and do not require separate taxonomic designations.
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    A Survey of the Branchiopod Crustaceans of Ohio
    (1997-09) Weeks, Stephen C.; Marcus, Vivien
    A survey of the non-cladoceran (for example, large) branchiopod crustaceans of Ohio was undertaken to identify the current distribution of these temporary pool inhabitants. A total of 49 temporary pools spanning 15 counties in Ohio were found to contain large branchiopods. Three species of large branchiopods were identified: two cold-water anostracans (E. neglectus and E. bundyi) and one warmwater conchostracan (C. gynecia}. Of these 3, E. neglectus was the most common, being found in 46 sites. The other 2 were comparatively rare, with E. bundyi found in 4 sites, and only 1 site having C. gynecia. The relative abundance of the anostracans is approximately similar to earlier surveys, indicating that where these temporary pools still exist, conditions remain conducive for survival of these shrimp. Four additional branchiopod species that have been previously described from Ohio (Eubranchipus holmani, Lynceus brachyurus, Eulimnadia inflecta, and Cyxicus morset) were not found in this survey.
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    Survey and Analysis of the Scioto Brush Creek Drainage Fish Fauna of Southern Ohio
    (1997-09) Cavender, Ted M.; Rice, Daniel L.
    The fish fauna in the Scioto Brush Creek watershed of south-central Ohio was sampled using a 1.8 m by 3-0 m, 4.8 mm mesh seine. The purpose was to determine if a quick, economical, survey of this type would provide an accurate assessment of the fish communities in the basin. A total of 47 species plus three hybrids representing 6684 individuals were captured at a total of 19 sites in seven streams during this survey. Two of the species captured in this study (warmouth [Lepomis gulosus] and dusky darter [Percina scieraj) were new records for the drainage. Another significant addition to the fauna was the collection of the popeye shiner (Notropis ariommus) at five sites in the lower mainstem of Scioto Brush Creek. This Ohio endangered species ranked eighth in abundance among the 47 species of fish collected in Scioto Brush Creek. Prior surveys dating back to 1921 had documented the occurrence of 67 species in this drainage. This study raises the known fish fauna in the drainage to 69 species. The results of this survey, coupled with electrofishing and hoop net data collected by other biologists between 1979 and 1985, when compared to surveys conducted prior to 1955 by Trautman, indicate that the original fish community of Scioto Brush Creek is still intact. Of the 60 species recorded for the drainage by Trautman (1981), it appears that only the bigeye chub (Notropis amblops) has disappeared from the system. The bluntnose minnow (Pimephales notatus) and striped shiner (Luxilus chrysocephalus) were the dominant members of the fish community in the mainstem and South Fork of Scioto Brush Creek during the 1985 survey followed by the brook silverside (Labidesthes sicculus), spotfin shiner (Cyprinella spilopterd) and longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis).
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    Comparison of White Crappie Populations in Diked and Undiked Lake Erie Wetlands
    (1997-09) Markham, Carol A.; Lynch, William E., Jr.; Johnson, David L.; Petering, Raymond W.
    Most of Ohio's remaining Lake Erie wetlands are diked to enhance habitat diversity. There is concern that fish communities in these wetlands may be isolated from adjacent waters. However, little data are available with which to evaluate possible isolation. We conducted a study that examined spring length frequencies, age structure, and growth of white crappie (Pomoxis annularis) populations in 3 diked wetlands and 2 undiked, adjacent areas. If populations are not isolated then differences in population parameters between the two types of systems should not be evident. White crappies were collected in April-May 1987 using trap nets. Length frequencies of white crappies were not similar between diked wetlands and adjacent areas, and mean lengths were significantly less in the diked wetlands. Populations were not comprised of similar age classes in the 5 systems. White crappies in diked wetlands grew significantly slower than their conspecifics in the undiked areas. These data indicate that white crappies hi diked wetlands are isolated from populations in undiked areas even though up to 75% of water in diked wetlands can be exchanged each year.
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    Nonglacial Surficial Processes during the Early and Middle Wisconsinan Substages from the Glaciated Allegheny Plateau in Ohio
    (1997-09) Szabo, John P.
    A review of the literature suggests that nonglacial surficial processes may be inferred from sites in Ohio of early through middle Wisconsinan age. These sites are not distributed uniformly and are identified by having post-Illinoian positions and nonfinite radiocarbon ages (that is, greater than 34,000 years). Organic deposits and paleosols of this age are comparatively common in the lowlands of southwestern Ohio, and the period is known to have experienced both warm and cool climates because some deposits contain oak, ash, and beech fossils, whereas others yield spruce. However, comparatively little evidence of this age has been found on the northwestern edge of the Allegheny Plateau in northeastern Ohio.
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    Front Matter
    (1997-09)