Ohio State University Research and Scholarship

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This collection contains Ohio State research and scholarship which doesn't currently fall under the jurisdiction of a specific community or collection in the Knowledge Bank.

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    Sparking Creative Prowess through a Peculiar Design Challenge: A Mocktail Design Charrette - Dataset
    (2023) Nickley, William; Proulx, Sébastien
    This dataset was the result of a survey from a recent experiment in mocktail design conducted with a group of industrial design students. This pedagogical strategy was devised to foster students’ creativity and confidence. After observing a level of creative deficit among the student body, we initiated an annual design charrette in 2021. Through the charrette, a short, sprint-like effort, we aimed to provide an exhilarating, low-risk space to foster students’ creative prowess. After two years, with interesting yet mitigated results where we observed students taking the assignment too seriously, at the expense of risk-taking, we looked for parameters that would more successfully support the goal of sparking a creative mindset. Inspired by speculative design methods, boundary objects, growth mindset, and self-efficacy theory, our most recent approach was to engage students with an uncanny topic - mocktails - to catalyze multi-level creative engagement.
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    An Intersectional Lens
    (Ohio State University. Department of Design, 2023-08) Brooks, Ashley
    Community-driven civic environments, such as public spaces, have a major influence on personal development and well-being (Matei, 2017). But without inclusion of marginalized populations, some people risk being excluded, perpetuating cycles of inequality that limit understanding, collective collaboration, diverse inclusion, and social progression. When designed inclusively, community-driven civic environments can succeed at welcoming all kinds of people and needs regardless of age, race, gender, sexuality, or income (Latham & Layton, 2019). This thesis demonstrates a qualitative research experience that utilized co-design and service design approaches to curate a unique and inclusive design process that centered the wants and needs of Black and Indigenous Women of Color (BIWOC). Focusing on BIWOC experiences within public spaces led to contextual understanding of how they behaved and thought holistically, allowing their journey of spatial understanding and enjoyment to be considered through inclusive touchpoints. Through a series of interviews, surveys, and co-design sessions, American Black women shared and reflected upon their personal and professional experiences and collaborated to imagine what an inclusive space could be when they led the conversation. In conclusion, they created a variety of spatial offerings and service considerations that increased cultural representation, enhanced comprehensions of safety, fostered an environment of learning, and valued who they are holistically. It became evident that a lack of humanity could never be replaced by design aesthetics. Beyond these realizations, this research illuminated Black women as critical thinkers who are creative, sensually driven, self-aware, spiritual, and systems focused.
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    An Intersectional Lens: Using Participatory Design to Redefine Inclusivity and Foster Belonging in Community-Driven Civic Environments with Black Indigenous Women of Color (BIWOC)
    (Ohio State University. Department of Design, 2023-08) Brooks, Ashley; Sanders, Elizabeth
    Community-driven civic environments, such as public spaces, have a major influence on personal development and well-being (Delagran, 2016). But without inclusion of marginalized populations, some people risk being excluded, perpetuating cycles of inequality that limit understanding, collective collaboration, diverse inclusion, and social progression. When designed inclusively, community-driven civic environments can succeed at welcoming all kinds of people and needs regardless of age, race, gender, sexuality, or income (Latham & Layton, 2019). This thesis demonstrates a qualitative research experience that utilized co-design and service design approaches to curate a unique and inclusive design process that centered the wants and needs of Black and Indigenous Women of Color (BIWOC). Focusing on BIWOC experiences within public spaces led to contextual understanding of how they behaved and thought holistically, allowing their journey of spatial understanding and enjoyment to be considered through inclusive touchpoints. Through a series of interviews, surveys, and co-design sessions, American Black women shared and reflected upon their personal and professional experiences and collaborated to imagine what an inclusive space could be when they led the conversation. In conclusion, they created a variety of spatial offerings and service considerations that increased cultural representation, enhanced comprehensions of safety, fostered an environment of learning, and valued who they are holistically. It became evident that a lack of humanity could never be replaced by design aesthetics. Beyond these realizations, this research illuminated Black women as critical thinkers who are creative, sensually driven, self-aware, spiritual, and systems focused.
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    Imagining Together: Sexual & Reproductive Futures
    (Ohio State University. Department of Design, 2023-08) Snyder, Camille
    Sexual and reproductive experiences, often unacknowledged or unspoken, exert a profound influence on various aspects of life, including relationships, careers, and the shape of our mutual futures, particularly for individuals assigned female at birth (AFAB). This research endeavors to explore the transformative potential that emerges when AFAB individuals are granted agency to speculate on the future; imagining, provoking, and dreaming into what could be. The study combined co-design and speculative design approaches to structure collaborative group sessions, during which study participants ultimately created 24 artifacts from the future related to contraception, sexual pleasure, and menstrual cycles; artifacts evidence participants' expressed perspectives on near and far futures. The study also involved focus groups to determine how to share the artifacts, considering questions like who should be invited, how should the artifacts be presented, and what is our intention in sharing? By embracing qualitative research methods, this study delves deep into the nuanced aspects of participants' dreams and fears about the future. The findings emphasize the significance of co-design and speculative design as complementary approaches in design research. They also highlight the capacity of AFAB individuals to imagine diverse and impactful futures beyond what currently exists. The conclusions drawn from this study call for further investigations into the synergistic potential of co-design and speculative design, contributing to a deeper understanding of the role of imagination in shaping future possibilities, particularly for complex, sensitive topics such as sexual and reproductive experiences.
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    Supplementary Materials for "Roundup and immune challenge have different effects on a native field cricket and its introduced competitor"
    (Springer Nature, 2023) Mullins, Lydia; Brown, Dylan; Lovsey, Shelly; Bowers, Troy; Gershman, Susan
    Animals face many natural challenges, and humans have added to this burden by applying potentially harmful herbicides and unintentionally introducing competitors. We examine the recently introduced Velafictorus micado Japanese burrowing cricket which shares the same microhabitat and mating season as the native Gryllus pennsylvanicus field cricket. In this study, we assess the combined effects of Roundup (glyphosate-based herbicide) and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) immune challenge on both crickets. In both species, an immune challenge reduced the numbers of eggs that female laid, however, this effect was much larger in G. pennsylvanicus. Conversely, Roundup caused both species to increase egg production, potentially representing a terminal investment strategy. When exposed to both an immune challenge and herbicide, G. pennsylvanicus fecundity was harmed more than V. micado fecundity. Further, V. micado females laid significantly more eggs than G. pennsylvanicus, suggesting that introduced V. micado may have a competitive edge in fecundity over native G. pennsylvanicus. LPS and Roundup each had differing effects on male G. pennsylvanicus and V. micado calling effort. Overall, introduced male V. micado spent significantly more time calling than native G. pennsylvanicus, which could potentially facilitate the spread of this introduced species. Despite the population-level spread of introduced V. micado, in our study, this species did not outperform native G. pennsylvanicus in tolerating immune and chemical challenge. Although V. micado appears to possess traits that make this introduced species successful in colonizing new habitats, it may be less successful in traits that would allow it to outcompete a native species.
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    A CURE for everyone: A guide to implementing Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences
    (The Ohio State University, 2023-05) Calède, Jonathan J.-M.
    In this book, I undertake a review of the literature on Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) and present original data from a survey of instructors at the Ohio State University. The main goal of this publication is to be a practical guide for teachers wishing to develop and implements this type of High-Impact Practice in their course. As such, I cover many aspects of the development of a CURE, including advice on research development, group formation and management, evaluation and grading, inclusive teaching, and assignment design. A large number of activity templates and resources accompany the text to facilitate classroom implementation.
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    Cybernetics & Curriculum Design
    (The Ohio State University Libraries, 2023) Tilak, Shantanu
    In this participatory design portfolio, I describe the theoretical framework, and provide a practical guide for a cybernetic curricular design approach applied to an educational psychology college class for preservice teachers. The first part describes how the two iterations of the curriculum were designed in a manner following Gordon Pask’s approach to cybernetics to create a technology-assisted collaborative environment, and Gregory Bateson’s idea on the double bind to make this environment informationally open, to allow students to transcend siloed communicative classroom systems to learn new ideas related to educational theory and practice from everyday life, popular culture, and the Internet. The second part describes tools/technologies, and activities used throughout the semester and contextualizes them within Paskian and Batesonian cybernetic frameworks. The third part provides a comprehensive week by week guide of the class schedule in the Fall 2022 and Spring 2023 sessions.
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    Metagames 2023
    (The Ohio State University Libraries, 2023) Tilak, Shantanu; Audia, Claire; Bah, Issaga; Barta, Kate; Bulazo, Marina; Colvard, Brennan; Dzierwa, Noah; Ferretti, Sam; Fries, Braxton; Gehrke, Christopher; Gipson, Lillia; Greve, Colleen; Guo, Julia; Hammill, Sarah; Jaenke, Christopher; Jahn, Anna; Jayanthi, Kavya; Lencke, Megan; Marsco, Lily; Moonshower, Paige; Picha, Parker; Robek, Bridgette; Schumaker, Leigha; Souders, Kiersten; Stefani, Charlotte; Tenerowicz, Avery; Wachowski, Ayla; Ward, Landon; Woods, Anna; Woods, Nevin; Zalewski, Laura
    This paper, co-authored by undergraduate students and their instructor part of an educational psychology seminar, describes a participatory curriculum design approach for preservice teacher education that focuses on the use of the principles of second-order cybernetics to teach about teaching and learning. Using elements of an Open Source Educational Processes framework, our Spring ESEPSY2309 section created project-based collective hive minds of preservice teachers, relying on a cybernetic approach at the crossroads of Gregory Bateson and Gordon Pask's theories. The classroom community used four innovative tool-mediated pillars to guide collaborative activity: 1) Live-chatting using the Reddit social media platform, 2) observation of the lives, strategies, and practices used by teachers and students in their own social networks through Soundcloud podcasting to expand their own perceptions of pedagogies and best practices that they could employ in their careers, 3) open-ended paper writing, exploring sources beyond the object language provided by the textbook through extensive dyadic conversations with the instructor, and 4) training in the use of the Alice 3 game creation tool for block programming enabling the accumulation of competence in designing classroom systems that may treat students these undergraduates would soon teach as active historical agents in learning environments, combining skills from varied subjects into transdisciplinary educational experiences. We showcase outcomes of our class projects using a narrative inquiry to describe podcast episodes, a topic network analysis to illustrate the expansive nature of Open Source writing activity, and a visual depiction of our class Alice 3 games.
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    Two Children's Stories about Food Security
    (The Ohio State University Libraries, 2023) Glassman, Michael; Tilak, Shantanu
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    BODIES
    (2022-04-26) Chaffee, Madison; Oberfield, Avery; Patterson, Danni; Regalo, Hope; Shook, Zoe; Stotlar, Jackson; Nisch-Quan, Kamlin
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    The 2022 Whole University Catalogue
    (The Ohio State University Libraries, 2022) Tilak, Shantanu; Allomong, Logan; Armstrong, Allyson; Ashbrook, Kristen; Cahill, Riley; Canales, Santino; Elser, Camryn; Fulton, Gray; Gomez, John; Gossman, Kara; Hochstetler, Emma; Hood, Leahandria; Lewis, Ellie; Liu, Haiqi; Lust, Allison; MacQueeney, Patrick; Mason, Elise; McKeown, Josiah; Negatu, Bemnet; Newland, Kylie; Patton, Briana; Penrod, Jordyn; Schrock, Kendra; Smith, Myranda; Surber, Charlotte; Svoboda, Jayna; Underwood, Allison; Walls, Keller; Widmer, Michaela; Wu, Lingfeng
    Each chapter is a co-generated tool, created by the students and instructor of ESEPSY2309, using visual storyboarding and scholarly written perspectives. The papers were collaboratively edited in a Study Hall activity in the last five weeks of class.
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    Moving across Differences: How Students Engage LGBTQ+ Themes in a High School Literature Class
    (State University of New York Press, 2022) Blackburn, Mollie V., 1969–
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    Afro-Sweden: Becoming Black in a Color-Blind Country
    (University of Minnesota Press, 2022) Skinner, Ryan Thomas
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    “Where am I?” A Critical Discourse Analysis of Religious Representation in Indonesia
    (The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), 2021-12-18) Dellarosa, Maretha
    The Indonesian Ministry of Education has re-examined the Indonesian curriculum to address the present challenges, including how to promote tolerance to students who live in a multicultural country. Textbooks and characters presented in Indonesian elementary textbooks, Buku Siswa, are part of continuous revision. However, there is insufficient consideration put to the characters presented, including which characters are included and excluded. In fact, understanding which characters are presented means that people learn how to construct phenomenon. As a country with diverse beliefs, Indonesian education system inserts religion as a mandatory subject, aims to promote the values of diversity. Nevertheless, the goal of such implementation does not always meet the outcomes since there are conflicts that occur due to religious beliefs. The study aims to examine power relationships and the ideological nature of discourse that is represented by seven characters in Buku Siswa by utilizing Critical Discourse Analysis. Buku Siswa is a series of elementary school textbooks that has different levels and themes. Findings reveal that characters that represent minority religious groups are missing from learning materials, which presents them unequally compared to characters that presents the majority of religious groups. I argue that representation is a way of respecting people.
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    A literature review of leadership training and a novel conceptual model of leader-member exchange theory for new dentists
    (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2021) Danesh, David; Huber, Thomas
    Describes the current state of leadership and leader-member exchange (LMX) theory in dentistry. Develops a novel conceptual model of LMX to guide future research and highlights the importance of enhancing leadership training for new dentists. A literature review exploring leadership in dentistry and LMX in dentistry was completed. The findings were analyzed with framework analysis to develop a novel conceptual model of LMX specific to dentistry. LMX theory was applied to leadership in dentistry, including a focus on new dentists, senior dentists, other dental team members, and the patient. A new conceptual model of the New Dentist LMX Quartet, unique and specific to new dentist teams, was developed. The study identifies the need for research in LMX in dentistry, contributes a new conceptual model for LMX theory, and identifies future research. Practitioners, policymakers, and educators can utilize this information to explore concepts in leadership and improve training and dental practice. No other studies specifically exploring LMX in dentistry for new dentists exist. This literature review and conceptual paper begins the conversation on developing understanding of leadership in dentistry through further research.
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    Causes and consequences of variation in development time in a field cricket
    (2021-11) Gershman, Susan
    Variation in development time can affect life history traits that contribute to fitness. In Gryllus vocalis, a non-diapausing cricket with variable development time, we used a path analysis approach to determine the causative relationships between parental age, offspring development time and offspring life history traits. Our best-supported path model included both the effects of parental age and offspring development time on offspring morphological traits. This result suggests that offspring traits are influenced by both variation in acquisition of resources and trade-offs between traits. We found that crickets with longer development times became larger adults with better phenoloxidase-based immunity. This is consistent with the hypothesis that crickets must make a trade-off between developing quickly to avoid predation before reproduction and attaining better immunity and a larger adult body size that provides advantages in male-male competition, mate choice, and female fecundity. Slower-developing crickets were also more likely to be short-winged (unable to disperse by flight). Parental age has opposing direct and indirect effects on the body size of daughters, but when both the direct and indirect effects of parental age are taken into account, younger parents had smaller sons and daughters. This pattern may be attributable to a parental trade-off between the number and size of eggs produced with younger parents producing more eggs with fewer resources per egg. The relationships between variables in the life history traits of sons and daughters were similar, suggesting that parental age and development time had similar causative effects on male and female life history traits.
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    Romanized standard Yi text supplement to The Nuosu Book of Origins: A Creation Epic from Southwest China
    (University of Washington Press, 2019) Bender, Mark; Wuwu, Aku
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    Health Equity and Anti-Racism Report: HEAR 2021
    (Wexner Medical Center, 2021) Kistler, Susannah Kistler; Kurtzman, Lori
    The events of 2020 magnified the existing health disparities and racial inequality in America in a way that cannot be ignored. Through the lens of COVID-19, we saw Black and indigenous people of color die at alarmingly higher rates than those from other racial and ethnic groups. The same populations were more likely to live in unsafe and overcrowded housing, work in essential infrastructure jobs in which they were unable to safely distance from others, and lack access to potentially lifesaving services and treatments. Such inequities are not new. They have been documented for centuries. But we believe that we can be part of the solution. For decades, Ohio State has been committed to serving populations made vulnerable in our community and beyond, improving access to care and helping individuals reach their optimal health not just through clinical care, but also by addressing the social determinants that we know have enormous impact on health outcomes. The initiatives you’re about to read about in this report are part of our efforts to correct systems of inequity and heal the damage caused by injustice. The Ohio State experts and pioneers behind these programs are creating significant, lasting change in central Ohio and beyond. And this is just the beginning. As our inaugural health equity and anti-racism report, this publication will show just a fraction of what our teams have achieved through partnering with our community this year, introduce some of the programs that have long been part of Ohio State’s legacy of caring for its neighbors, and highlight areas in which we hope to improve and have a sustainable impact. More stories about Ohio State’s efforts in these areas will be continue to be added to our websites, including on our anti-racism initiatives page at go.osu.edu/arap.