Ohio Journal of Science: Volume 67, Issue 2 (March, 1967)

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Front Matter
pp 0
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (969KB)

Geologic Aspects of a Recent Landslide in Vinton County, Ohio
Webb, David K., Jr.; Collins, Horace R. pp 65-74
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (733KB)

Reactions Between Pb2+ and (I-+I3) in Acidic Silica Gels
Kurz, Philip F. pp 74-77
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (283KB)

The Castalia Prairie
Sears, Paul Bigelow pp 78-88
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (737KB)

Book Reviews
pp 88-88
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (77KB)

New Cave Pseudoscorpions of the Genus Apochthonius (Arachnida: Chelonethida)
Muchmore, William B. pp 89-95
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (626KB)

Pollen Stratigraphy and Age of an Early Postglacial Beaver Site Near Columbus, Ohio
Garrison, Gail C. pp 96-105
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (3741KB)

Studies of the Gyponinae : Two New Genear, Chilenana and Chilella (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)
DeLong, Dwight M.; Freytag, Paul H. pp 105-112
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (521KB)

Earth Science in Ohio's Secondary Schools
Skinner, Ray, Jr. pp 113-120
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (574KB)

Influence of Salinity and Temperature on Seed Germination
Ungar, Irwin A. pp 120-123
Article description | Article Full Text PDF (299KB)

A Life History Study of the Ash Seed Weevils, Thysanocnemis Bischoffi Blatchley and T. Helvola Leconte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
Barger, Jack H.; Davidson, Ralph Howard pp 123-127
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Book Reviews
pp 127-128
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Back Matter
pp 999
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    Back Matter
    (1967-03)
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    Book Reviews
    (1967-03)
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    A Life History Study of the Ash Seed Weevils, Thysanocnemis Bischoffi Blatchley and T. Helvola Leconte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
    (1967-03) Barger, Jack H.; Davidson, Ralph Howard
    A life history study was made of the ash seed weevils, Thysanocnemis bischoffi Blatchley and T. helvola LeConte. Over-wintering occurs as larvae in ash seeds or in soil, with adults appearing in July and August. Adults soon deposit eggs within ash seeds, where larval development occurs. Only one generation per year was observed for each species.
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    Influence of Salinity and Temperature on Seed Germination
    (1967-03) Ungar, Irwin A.
    Experiments with two halophytic and one non-halophytic species indicate that there is an interaction between the effects of temperature and salinity on seed germination. Salicornia europaea, the most salt-tolerant species studied, was stimulated by high temperatures, whereas germination of Medicago sativa and Spergularia marina was inhibited by the highest temperature regime (32 °C).
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    Earth Science in Ohio's Secondary Schools
    (1967-03) Skinner, Ray, Jr.
    Earth science has been initiated into many high school curricula in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania during the past decade. With the availability of Earth Science Curriculum Project materials, many more schools will be including earth science in their science offerings. This study attempts to assess the status of earth science in Ohio by means of a questionnaire survey, made in 1964-65. A short questionnaire was mailed to each of sixty earth science teachers in 52 high schools in Ohio. Analysis of the 51 completed returns provided the following data: In 1964-65, earth science was taught at all grade levels in some of the high schools. It was offered to students at all ability levels, though some schools offered it only to higher ability students. There was very little opposition to the initiation of earth science in the schools; most teachers felt that earth science should be expanded in their schools. Although the background preparation of the teachers in the earth sciences was not impressive, most of the teachers had substantial backgrounds in the other sciences and were willing to improve their training through attendance at summer institutes in earth science.
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    Studies of the Gyponinae : Two New Genear, Chilenana and Chilella (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)
    (1967-03) DeLong, Dwight M.; Freytag, Paul H.
    Two new genera of Gyponinae, Chilenana and Chilella are described, both from Chile. Seven species, all new, C. similara, C. diverta, C. exilis, C. chilena, C. proxima, C. singularis, and C. flexa are described and placed in Chilenana. One species, C. rugella, is described and is the genotype of Chilella.
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    Pollen Stratigraphy and Age of an Early Postglacial Beaver Site Near Columbus, Ohio
    (1967-03) Garrison, Gail C.
    A former bog, buried under urban debris, was exposed during foundation excavation at Refugee Road, southeast Columbus, Ohio. Pollen samples were collected at two-inch intervals from 2 to 7 1/2 feet below the present surface. The uppermost 3 feet of peat, overlying 2 1/2 feet of detritus gyttja, contained numerous pieces of spruce (Picea), willow (Salix), and juniper (Juniperus). Many pieces showed beaver toothmarks and were presumably a part of a beaver dam or lodge. Because of their small width, the beaver toothmarks are interpreted as representing those of the common beaver, Castor canadensis. Pollen analyses indicate that beaver occupied the site more than 12,000 years ago, and that the site was abandoned prior to the increase in oak and other hardwood pollen which marks the beginning of the hypsithermal interval.
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    New Cave Pseudoscorpions of the Genus Apochthonius (Arachnida: Chelonethida)
    (1967-03) Muchmore, William B.
    Six new cavernicolous species of the pseudoscorpion genus Apochthonius are described. These are A. colecampi and A. typhlus from Missouri, A. diabolus from Arkansas, A. indianensis from Indiana, A. holsingeri from Virginia, and A. paucispinosus from West Virginia.
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    Book Reviews
    (1967-03)
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    The Castalia Prairie
    (1967-03) Sears, Paul Bigelow
    The Castalia Prairie in northern Ohio developed on 3000 or more acres of calcareous deposit averaging 6 to 7 feet in thickness and representing an interval of some 8000 years. Below it, at 54 feet, are lake sediments that accumulated on till during an interval of about 5000 years. Pollen analysis shows a transition from spruce dominance to deciduous forest and grassland conditions just above the lake sediments, with a subsequent increase in herbaceous (prairie) pollen. However, peaks of prairie pollen occur within the (coniferous) lake sediments, indicating that representatives of the grassland community had already migrated eastward during the time of glacial retreat and were at hand to become established at the onset of xerothermic conditions around 3600 years ago.
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    Reactions Between Pb2+ and (I-+I3) in Acidic Silica Gels
    (1967-03) Kurz, Philip F.
    In this work it was found that reactions between Pb2+ and (I-+I3-) in acidic silica gels are limited to the formation of Pbl2 from Pb2++2 I- and from Pb2++2I J , the latter occurring with the coincident formation of I2 crystals. There was no evidence of pseudomorphic conversion of I2 to Pbl2, even by the presence of large excesses of Pb2+, in contrast to reactions in acidic gels between excess Hg2+, Ag+, or Tl+ and I2, in which instances these metal cations convert I2 pseudomorphically to the respective iodides. When a deficiency of Pb2+ existed, there was no zone separation of Pbl2 and I2, as occurs with Hgl2, Agl, or Til and I2 in metal-ion deficient systems, and the distributions of Pbl2 and I2 crystals were random.
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    Geologic Aspects of a Recent Landslide in Vinton County, Ohio
    (1967-03) Webb, David K., Jr.; Collins, Horace R.
    A study was made of a recent landslide along a newly opened, relocated section of U. S. Route 50 in Vinton County, Ohio. This segment of highway is located in the abandoned valley of a minor tributary of the Teays River system. The investigation revealed that a highly laminated lake deposit was the major component of the slide. Mineralogical and particle-size determinations show that this material is an extremely fine-grained, illitic clay having characteristics similar to those of the Minford Silt. Several of the physical properties determined in this study suggest that this type of deposit is likely to become unstable wherever disturbed by heavy construction and, since material of this type appears to be widespread in the valleys of the Teays drainage system, such deposits should be given special attention by design engineers.
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    Front Matter
    (1967-03)