International Journal of Rural Criminology: Volume 5, Issue 2 (September 2020)

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Issue DOI: https://doi.org/10.18061/1811/92025

Guest Editor's Introduction to Volume 5, Issue 2
DeKeseredy, Walter S.
pp. 160-161
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Thinking theoretically about male violence against women in rural places: A review of the extant sociological literature and suggestions for future theorizing
DeKeseredy, Walter S.; Rennison, Callie M.
pp. 162-180
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The impact of rurality on women's 'space for action' in domestic violence: Findings from a meta-synthesis
Farhall, Kate; Harris, Bridget; Woodlock, Delanie
pp. 181-203
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A perfect storm: Violence toward women in the Bakken oil patch
Ruddell, Rick; Britto, Sarah
pp. 204-227
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Violence against women of Belize in rural communities
Warren-Gordon, Kiesha
pp. 228-243
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#MeToo in regional, rural and remote Australia: An analysis of regional newspapers reports profiling the movement
Loney-Howes, Rachel; Fileborn, Bianca
pp. 244-275
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Intimate partner femicide in context: An examination of firearm type across the rural/urban divide
Mancik, Ashley M.; Stansfield, Richard; Kinard, Sylessia M.
pp. 276-299
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Fitting In: A Book Review Essay on Rural Prisons and Prisoner Re-entry through the Lens of a Rural Critical Criminology
Gido, Rosemary; Donnermeyer, Joseph F.
pp. 300-317
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  • Item
    Guest Editor's Introduction to Volume 5, Issue 2
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) DeKeseredy, Walter S.
  • Item
    Thinking theoretically about male violence against women in rural places: A review of the extant sociological literature and suggestions for future theorizing
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) DeKeseredy, Walter S.; Rennison, Callie M.
    Sociological research on male-to-female violence against women in rural places has mushroomed over the past 20 years. Nonetheless, theoretical developments are not keeping pace with the burgeoning contemporary empirical literature. This article reviews the current state of sociological theoretical work in the field and suggests new ways of thinking theoretically about woman abuse in rural places.
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    The impact of rurality on women's 'space for action' in domestic violence: Findings from a meta-synthesis
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) Farhall, Kate; Harris, Bridget; Woodlock, Delanie
    Men's violence against women is a global human rights issue, with domestic violence one of the most common forms (World Health Organization, 2017). The consequences of domestic violence include detrimental effects on victim-survivors' health, well-being, and sense of safety. To understand these impacts, the concept of 'space for action' seeks to evaluate how perpetrators of domestic violence narrow women's life choices, constraining their freedom (Kelly, 2003). In this article, we build upon the concept of 'space for action' by examining if, and how, rural geographical space and place can be used by perpetrators to constrict women's options for escape, or even shape the violence itself. In conducting a meta-synthesis of 32 global studies, we found similarities in rural women's experiences of violence. Perpetrators used both geographical space and rural social norms to constrain women's space for action. In particular, geographical and social isolation were used to hold women in literal captivity. Rural communities were often experienced as shaming and ostracizing. This provided women with few opportunities to help-seek and aided perpetrators in reducing women's spaces for safety. Women's space for action was also curtailed in the realms of finance, employment, and their ability to care for their children. These findings demonstrate that geographical place and space can be used by perpetrators to narrow and limit women's space for action. As such, rurality should be included in understanding how men's violence limits women's freedoms.
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    A perfect storm: Violence toward women in the Bakken oil patch
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) Ruddell, Rick; Britto, Sarah
    Communities in the Bakken region of Montana and North Dakota that experienced a resource-based boom starting in the mid-2000s had significant increases in the volume and seriousness of violence toward women. We identify five community factors distinctive to these boomtowns that created a perfect storm where these crimes proliferated including: (a) precarious housing arrangements; (b) the social isolation of women; (c) lack of domestic violence shelters and other social supports for survivors; (d) a workplace culture in the oilfields supportive of substance abuse and hyper-masculinity, and; (e) the inability of boomtown justice systems to respond to these crimes in an effective or timely manner. Although this critical analysis describes the outcomes in a U.S. jurisdiction, the conditions in rapid growth communities are similar throughout the globe and we suggest these community factors be considered in the responses to domestic and intimate partner violence in these rural areas. Our goal in identifying these factors is to work toward the development of an intervention model for officials anticipating resource-based booms to mitigate this violence.
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    Violence against women of Belize in rural communities
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) Warren-Gordon, Kiesha
    Belize is a diverse Central American country with a population of approximately 324,528, of which over 54% live in rural communities. The Belizean population is made up of Mestizo, Afro-Creole, Maya, Garifuna, and Mennonite identities, along with other groups such as East Indian, Lebanese, and Chinese, making the country rich with diverse cultures. Despite the vast cultural diversity of Belize, cultural constructions of femininity and masculinity have led to strong gender-based structures resulting in high rates of violence against women. According to the World Health Organization, 70.34% of Belizean women living in rural communities report experiencing episodes of intimate partner violence. In order to truly understand the phenomenon of violence against women, it must be conceptualized within the cultural context of Belize. In this paper, the author analyzes interviews with Belizean women from rural communities in central Belize who have been victims of violence at the hands of their intimate partners. Utilizing the theoretical perspective of intersectionality to explore how rurality shapes structural, political, and representational aspects of violence against Belizean women, this study will provide a robust understanding of Belizean women as victims of intimate partner violence. Policy implications are provided that would strengthen the social, cultural, and economic role of women in Belize. This research adds to the body of literature focusing on the victimization of women in rural communities.
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    #MeToo in regional, rural and remote Australia: An analysis of regional newspapers reports profiling the movement
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) Loney-Howes, Rachel; Fileborn, Bianca
    The #MeToo movement sparked a global conversation and moment of reckoning in relation to sexual violence. The hashtag campaign, developed from a tweet sent by actress Alyssa Milano (though the phrase was originally coined by African American activist Tarana Burke some decade earlier), provided a moment for survivors to share their experiences in a context in which they were perhaps more likely to be supported and believed. The #MeToo movement also created an opportunity to engage in a more productive dialogue about the causes and the challenges underpinning the prevention of gender-based violence. Yet, #MeToo has been subject to substantive critique, particularly in relation to modes of representation within media reporting. In addition, there is also little is known about how the #MeToo movement was impactful beyond major urban centres and resonated in regional, rural, and remote (RRR) locations. This article addresses both these issues drawing on a thematic analysis of 70 newspaper articles from RRR newspapers in Australia reporting on or responding to the #MeToo movement. While the data reveals some progressive approaches to documenting how the #MeToo movement impacted some RRR communities, as well as profiling some of the key challenges facing RRR communities in addressing gender-based violence, the specific voices represented in newspaper reporting, continues to reflect the perspectives of white, heterosexual women. We conclude by suggesting further research exploring the nature of reporting on #MeToo in other RRR spaces is needed to understand the full extent to which sexual violence is understood and represented. In addition, more specific work with survivors in RRR Australia and globally is vital to understand the dynamics and complexities of responding to and preventing sexual violence and the challenges associated with the geographies of speaking out.
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    Intimate partner femicide in context: An examination of firearm type across the rural/urban divide
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) Mancik, Ashley M.; Stansfield, Richard; Kinard, Sylessia M.
    Previous research on intimate partner homicide (IPH) has established that intimate partner homicides are overwhelmingly committed with a firearm. Emerging research suggests the risk of partner violence turning lethal in rural America is often exacerbated by a higher prevalence of firearm ownership, as well as the limited availability of victim support services, economic disadvantages, and access to healthcare services. Given that IPH represents one of the most common types of homicide in rural areas, understanding the prevalence and associated risk and protective factors presents important policy implications. Using county-level data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's National Violent Death Reporting System for the years 2015-2016 and controlling for well-established structural correlates of IPH, this research examines the nature and prevalence of IPH across county context. We investigate whether leading predictors of IPH (firearm access, domestic violence support services, and economic disadvantage) are associated with firearm and non-firearm IPH incidents equally and whether these relationships hold when comparing rural and urban counties. We further examine the unique dynamics of firearm specific IPH, including a comparison of IPH incidents committed with handguns versus long guns, given their differing prevalence and cultural context in rural and urban communities. Findings reveal important differences across the rural-urban divide and weapon types. Implications for research and policy are discussed.
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    Fitting In: A Book Review Essay on Rural Prisons and Prisoner Re-entry through the Lens of a Rural Critical Criminology
    (Ohio State University. Libraries, 2020-09) Gido, Rosemary; Donnermeyer, Joseph F.