Working Papers in Linguistics: Volume 52 (Summer 1999)

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Historical Linguistics. Edited by Brian D. Joseph


Front Matter
pp. i-ix
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Chinese and Austronesian: what's up?
Jansche, Martin pp. 1-14
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The Development of Counterfactuals with thélo: 'want' in Early Modern Greek
Pappas, Panayiotis pp. 15-40
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Triple Splits from Proto-Buli-Kɔnni
Cahill, Michael pp. 41-49
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The Mind and Spirit of Old English mōd and fer(h)ð: The Interaction of Metrics and Compounding
Stewart, Thomas W., Jr. pp. 51-61
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Ringe Revisited: Comments on Ringe's Probabilistic Comparison Method
Welby, Pauline; Whitman, Neal pp. 63-75
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Etymology of 'volga'
Weller, James pp. 77-88
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Short-form "Doubling Verbs" in Schwyzerdütsch
Schaengold, Charlotte Christ pp. 89-95
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Progressive Constructions in the Spanish Spoken in Puerto Rico
Ramos-Pellicia, Michelle F. pp. 97-112
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Tracing the Functional Expansion of the Self-pronoun
Golde, Karin pp. 113-136
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Ruling Out Chance, Universality, and Borrowing: an Alternative to Ringe
Goh, Gwang-Yoon pp. 137-149
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Evaluating Semantic Shifts: The Case of Indo-European *(s)meuk- and Indo-Iranian *muč-
Joseph, Brian D.; Karnitis, Catherine S. pp. 151-158
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Tracing the Origins of the Slavic Imperfective be-Future
Whaley, Marika pp. 159-170
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The Advent of the English Prepositional Passive: a Multi-faceted Morphosyntactic Change
Goh, Gwang-Yoon pp. 171-202
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Variation in Voiced Stop Prenasalization in Greek
Arvaniti, Amalia; Joseph, Brian D. pp. 203-233
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Proto-Mixe-Zoquean: A Case in Linguistic and Cultural Reconstruction
Hilts, Craig pp. 235-248
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A Plain Difference: Variation in Case-Marking in a Pennsylvania German Speaking Community
Keiser, Steve Hartman pp. 249-288
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Now showing 1 - 17 of 17
  • Item
    Front Matter (Volume 52, Summer 1999)
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999)
  • Item
    Chinese and Austronesian: what's up?
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Jansche, Martin
  • Item
    The Development of Counterfactuals with thélo: 'want' in Early Modern Greek
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Pappas, Panayiotis
  • Item
    Triple Splits from Proto-Buli-Kɔnni
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Cahill, Michael
  • Item
    The Mind and Spirit of Old English mōd and fer(h)ð: The Interaction of Metrics and Compounding
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Stewart, Thomas W., Jr.
  • Item
    Ringe Revisited: Comments on Ringe's Probabilistic Comparison Method
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Welby, Pauline; Whitman, Neal
  • Item
    Etymology of 'volga'
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Weller, James
  • Item
    Short-form "Doubling Verbs" in Schwyzerdütsch
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Schaengold, Charlotte Christ
  • Item
    Progressive Constructions in the Spanish Spoken in Puerto Rico
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Ramos-Pellicia, Michelle F.
    The continuous contact between English and Spanish in the Puerto Rican society has resulted in a situation that promotes the use of English as a linguistic model for imitation. Researchers such as Vázquez (1974: 75-77) have posited that interpolation of adverbial phrases in progressive constructions and other variations in the use of the gerund in Puerto Rican Spanish are the direct result of interference from English. Others such as Morales (1986: 41) have pointed out that in the linguistic interferences in the Spanish spoken in Puerto Rico, the speaker selects syntactic rules or processes from the English language. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that those speakers with the greatest amount of contact with English will produce these innovative forms with greater frequency than those with limited English interference. This paper tests these hypotheses through the examination of the following structure: forms with semantically telic verbs in a progressiveconstruction (e.g. 'Estaba disparando un tiro.' 'S/He was firing a shot.'). These progressive constructions were obtained through sociolinguistic interviews of 18 speakers of Puerto Rican Spanish. The participants also completed a questionnaire which revealed the level of contact with English that each speaker had. A total of 501 tokens from their speech was examined. These tokens were correlated with a variety of factors based on the information collected by the questionnaires. The quantitative analysis of these factors was accomplished by using the statistics package for sociolinguistic analysis, GoldVarb 2.0. The main results were that those speakers who had no exposure to English in the United States have a positive correlation with usage of relic verbs in progressive constructions, while those with more exposure to English at higher levels of education have a negative correlation for usage of telic verbs in progressive constructions. On the other hand, those speakers who used Spanish as well as English outside the home have a higher frequency of usage of telic verbs in progressive constructions than those who only used Spanish in the same linguistic domains.
  • Item
    Tracing the Functional Expansion of the Self-pronoun
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Golde, Karin
  • Item
    Ruling Out Chance, Universality, and Borrowing: an Alternative to Ringe
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Goh, Gwang-Yoon
  • Item
    Evaluating Semantic Shifts: The Case of Indo-European *(s)meuk- and Indo-Iranian *muč-
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Joseph, Brian D.; Karnitis, Catherine S.
  • Item
    Tracing the Origins of the Slavic Imperfective be-Future
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Whaley, Marika
  • Item
    The Advent of the English Prepositional Passive: a Multi-faceted Morphosyntactic Change
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Goh, Gwang-Yoon
  • Item
    Variation in Voiced Stop Prenasalization in Greek
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Arvaniti, Amalia; Joseph, Brian D.
    Ancient Greek clusters of nasal (N) plus voiceless unaspirated (T) or voiced stop (D) merged to ND in Middle Greek, yielding mainly ND or D in the modern dialects. Impressionistic studies suggest that currently there is stylistic variation between D and ND in the dialects that have developed these reflexes, with ND as the formal variant. Our study reveals that age, not style, is the most important factor in ND/D variation, with speakers under 40 using dramatically fewer ND tokens than older speakers; at the same time NT, a variant which reflects spelling conventions and is possible only across word boundaries, emerges as a careful style marker. This abrupt change of pattern, which coincides with important sociopolitical changes in Greece and the official demise of Katharevousa, the H(igh) variety of Greek diglossia, suggests that a real sound change in progress away from the previous pattern of stable variation may be taking place in Greece.
  • Item
    Proto-Mixe-Zoquean: A Case in Linguistic and Cultural Reconstruction
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Hilts, Craig
  • Item
    A Plain Difference: Variation in Case-Marking in a Pennsylvania German Speaking Community
    (Ohio State University. Department of Linguistics, 1999) Keiser, Steve Hartman
    Previous studies (e.g., Huffines 1989, Louden 1987) have demonstrated that Pennsylvania German (PG) is undergoing processes of convergence to English but that these processes differ between plain communities (i.e., Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonite) and non-plain communities. I investigate a question that these studies have not addressed: what is the degree of variation within plain and nonplain communities? Data collected from 70 PG speakers from one traditional plain community (Old Order Amish) and two historically plain communities (Conservative Mennonite, and Mennonite) in Kalona, Iowa are analyzed for variation in dative case-marking. A comparison with Huffines's study shows that there are considerable differences in usage between these plain communities and those that she studied. In addition, quantitative analyses reveal that in Kalona, patterns of usage correlate most strongly with the speaker's age, reflecting an earlier period of relative social and linguistic homogeneity in the local religious communities. Quantitative analyses also provide an indication of which functions of dative case-marking are undergoing the most rapid attrition. I discuss the implications that these findings have for the past and continuing development of PG varieties in the U.S.