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Influence of Perinatal Exposure to a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture on Learning and Memory, Hippocampal Size, and Estrogen Receptor-Beta Expression

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/52802

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Title: Influence of Perinatal Exposure to a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture on Learning and Memory, Hippocampal Size, and Estrogen Receptor-Beta Expression
Creators: Desai, Avanti N.; McFarland, Ashley; Cromwell, Howard Casey; Meserve, Lee A.
Issue Date: 2010-12
Citation: The Ohio Journal of Science, v110, n5 (December, 2010), 114-119.
Abstract: Perinatal exposure to PCB has been reported to cause a variety of health effects including endocrine disruption, and immunologic, reproductive, neurologic, and behavioral deficits. In the present study, a mixture of two PCB congeners, one noncoplanar (PCB 47) and one coplanar (PCB 77), were administered to young female Sprague-Dawley rats by route of maternal dietary consumption (either 12.5 ppm or 25.0 ppm, w/w). Impact on learning and memory were examined by radial arm maze on postnatal day 24-27. After behavioral tests were completed, the rats were transcardially perfused, and brains were excised. Immunohistochemistry for ER- β was carried out on free-floating sections. Sections were stained with cresyl violet stain, and hippocampal area was measured. A subjective comparison of staining density suggested a greater intensity of ER- β staining in female rat hippocampus exposed to PCB 47/77 at 25 ppm concentration. A decrease in the hippocampal area measurement was observed in the case of 25 ppm PCB exposed rats. Significant behavioral effects involving spatial learning and memory were not observed. However, animals exposed to PCB 47/77 at 25 ppm displayed a trend toward improved performance. Taken together, the combination in PCB exposed rats of reduced hippocampal size, increased ER-β concentration, and unaltered behavior suggests the existence of compensatory mechanisms in the animals.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/52802
ISSN: 0030-0950
Rights: Reproduction of articles for non-commercial educational or research use granted without request if credit to The Ohio State University and The Ohio Academy of Science is given.
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