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Determining the Correlation Between Biomechanical Loads Indicative of Over-use Running Injuries and Core Strength and Stability

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Title: Determining the Correlation Between Biomechanical Loads Indicative of Over-use Running Injuries and Core Strength and Stability
Creators: Jamison, Steve
Advisor: Chaudhari, Ajit
Issue Date: 2008-06
Abstract: An estimated 74% of runners experience an over-use running injury over the course of a season. Over-use running injuries are injuries that occur due to repeated biomechanical loadings and include patellofemoral pain, iliotibial band syndrome, and stress fractures, to name a few. Hip adduction moment, knee adduction impulse, and vertical ground reaction force are examples of biomechanical loadings that have been shown to be indicators of specific over-use running injuries. Core strength and stability have both been shown to be indicative of over-use running injuries, but which injuries and how they relate is still unknown. The focus of this study was to try to determine the link between biomechanical loadings indicative of running over use injuries and core strength and stability. This was done by first measuring 14 subjects’ core strength and stability. Then, using motion capture equipment, specific biomechanical loadings were calculated. It was found that core strength correlates significantly with core stability, which was expected. It was also determined that both core strength and stability played a role in the biomechanical loads experienced during running. However, because of the relatively small sample size, the significance of these roles remains unknown.
Embargo: No embargo
Series/Report no.: The Ohio State University. Department of Mechanical Engineering Honors Theses; 2008
Keywords: Biomechanics
Running Injuries
Core Strength
Core Stability
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1811/32077
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